Be Besties with Your Beasties

Without bacteria we would die. Yet we wage war against them as if bacteria were a mortal enemy.  And we try to kill everything as a solution to any problem. Years ago, Heartland Healing wrote about biophobia, a portmanteau we coined describing humans’ irrational fear of life and living things. We kill animals, insects, weeds, plants, bacteria, viruses without considering the consequences. Our earlier column on biophobia is pretty good so if you missed it, we reprise it here.

Humankind typically tries to solve a problem by destroying or killing. Nothing could be more misguided than our intense crusade to kill bacteria that exist all around us and within our bodies. It turns out that even scientists, who typically lag…

entered on 03/03/15 at 09:00 AM | read more »


It’s a lonely old town

The next few years will bring a change in the way people think about antiques. A preservationist instinct will take over, with people being less concerned with collecting items for age, beauty, or value, and instead collect items for historical significance. There will especially be an explosion of collectors with a great interest in regional history, collecting items from local department stores, restaurants, closed movie theaters, and the like. Clubs will form where collectors bring new items they have found, along with stories they have researched about the items, resulting in groups of people who are intimately familiar with the history of their town, neighborhood -- even of something as localized as the house they live in.

entered on 03/02/15 at 02:49 PM | read more »


News You Can Use — Good, Bad, Ugly

Recent news items to keep the brain cells percolating.

The Good

Eggs aren’t bad anymore. Eggs never were bad in my estimation. Decades ago when the common wisdom was that butter was bad and margarine was good, I didn’t buy that either. Even as a grade school kid, eating something that science had concocted instead of a natural food didn’t make sense to me.

Eggs have been freed from the aspersions that science cast upon them as far back as the 1950s. It’s good news that people unaccustomed to thinking for themselves can now take the word of the same “experts” who told them eggs were bad, now telling them that eggs are okay. Well, at least the panel is…

entered on 02/23/15 at 11:35 AM | read more »


<p>The future of skin color is limited only by your imagination.</p>The Skin I’m In

The next few years will see an enormous break from the past in terms of skin color. Inexpensive dyes will come on the market that will make it possible to have any skin color you like. At first, this will simply allow people to lighten or darken their skin, but soon bright primary colors will become available, as will complex dying processes that allow people to put multicolored patterns on their skin. The dyes will be semi-permanent, in that they will change a person's skin color until the next time they get their skin dyed.

People will start to dye their skin to identify with peer groups, sports teams, or even popular bands, many of whom will perform in signature…

entered on 02/23/15 at 03:37 PM | read more »


<p>Moths may hold the key to better, cheaper, and healthier dining.</p>A new way for fast food to bug you

Fast food will continue to be popular for the near future, but will become both more adventursome and healthier. A slew of "foodie"-style fast food restaurants will spring up, dedicated to making great food quickly and affordably. Often this will mean using unusual ingredients that manage to be both low price but highly nutritious, and, with great frequency, these additives will be insect protein. Moth flour will find its way into most American foods, and, to a lesser degree, supplements made from meal worm, ant, and the like.

Initially, all but the boldest diners will find this unappealing, but it will so quickly become an accepted dietary staple that people will regularly purchase insect protein for home cooking. A century…

entered on 02/16/15 at 02:28 PM | read more »


Epigenetics

I was excited to read The Double Helix when I was young. That was the account by James Watson of the discovery of deoxyribonucleic acid as the building block of life. I was always looking for explanations and causes in those days and it seemed Watson and Francis Crick had identified DNA as life’s foundation. It was indeed a landmark scientific moment in understanding the biological sequence over time; how worms, monkeys, insects, humans and all living things shared a blueprint.

DNA explained it all: why one person has blue eyes and the other brown, one was tall and the other short, one person slim and another hefty. Everything, including how we behaved, could be found in that coded strip…

entered on 02/16/15 at 07:39 AM | read more »


The Sex Issue

The fundamentals of sex may not have changed much over the years but societal attitudes, relationship dynamics, and the means of meeting partners and communicating look very different than they did even in the not-too-distant past. The Reader surveyed four local experts to get a snapshot of what sex and relationships look like today:

DR. SOFIA JAWED-WESSEL Assistant professor at the University of Nebraska Omaha in the School of Health, Physical Education and Recreation. “I teach in the area of sexual health and I also do research on sexuality,” she said.

NANCI KAVICH Co-founder of Profile Wingman. “I help people write their online dating profiles and to navigate the world of on- and offline dating in general. It’s so…

entered on 02/11/15 at 03:27 PM | read more »


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Assumptions

Bo Pelini behaved as if he had coached his last game at Nebraska, based on his sideline and post-game decorum, or lack thereof. That was the...

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Attention to detail

If not for Sam Burtch, the most dramatic play of this Nebraska football season might never have happened.

If not for Burtch, Ron Kellogg III...

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Sack leader

As David Santos remembers it, Connor Cook was rolling out and he was pursuing the Michigan State quarterback when Nebraska teammate Randy Gregory...

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Planet Power: Nov. 21 - 27, 2013

Happy Thanksgiving. Let’s be nice to each other and cultivate warm thoughts. You are what you think…
—MOJOPOPlanetPower.com

i SAGITTARIUS...

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Planet Power: Nov. 14 - 20, 2013

This issue marks my 17th year here at The “READER.” Thanks to John, Eric, my beloved Carrie, et al., for all your help, encouragement and...

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Planet Power: November 7 - 13, 2013

The new Aquarian-Age astrology is/will be ruled by the planet Uranus (yeah, I’ve heard that joke before). Traditional astrology, prior to the...

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Planet Power: Oct. 31 - Nov. 6, 2013

Happy Halloween! Let your subconscious desires flow as the twilight fades into the black of the night of the year. Don’t fear the night. You have...

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News You Can Use — Good, Bad, Ugly

Recent news items to keep the brain cells percolating.

The Good

Eggs aren’t bad anymore. Eggs never were bad in my estimation. Decades ago when the...

more »


Epigenetics

I was excited to read The Double Helix when I was young. That was the account by James Watson of the discovery of deoxyribonucleic acid as the...

more »


Vaccines: A Shot in the Dark

While raging about vaccines, both sides of the aisle seem fraught with emotion. Anti-vaxxers and pro-vaxxers are vehement in supporting their...

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Good Vibrations — the Cure for Hysteria

Just over 100 years ago, the most common cause for a woman to visit her family physician was a bad case of hysteria, a scourge once common in the...

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