Tapestries to celebrate neighborhoods

Theater by any other name

The play's still the thing with the Great Plains Theatre Conference but organizers are making a concerted effort to expand theater's definition in order to connect more people to it.

The May 26-29 PlayFest is the Metropolitan Community College conference's answer to making theater more accessible. That means staging works at nontraditional sites, including one along the riverfront, and, new this year, holding Neighborhood Tapestries in the inner city.

The inaugural tapestries, a cross-between a chautauqua, a street arts event, a storytelling festival, a salon and a variety show, will happen outdoor on separate dates in North and South Omaha. Each neighborhood's art, culture and history will be celebrated through a loose program of music, poetry, stories, dance and other creative expressions. The performers will include professionals and amateurs.

On May 27 the North Omaha tapestry, directed by Denise Chapman, will interpret the area's African American experience at the Union for Contemporary Art at 2417 Burdette Street.

Chapman, an actress and stage director, is the Omaha Community Playhouse education director and a Metropolitan Community College theater instructor. She's worked with a team to produce the event.

"We're creating a thread," she says. "We are thinking of our show as a block. So who are these people on the block? Borrowing from Sesame Street. who are the people in your neighborhood? We want to have this musical and movement throughline with these transitional words and the sharing of these stories as people get up and talk about community and food, growing up on the North Side, memories of their mothers and just all these different people you might encounter on a street in North Omaha.

"That thread allows us to plug in people as we get them, as they see fit. Who knows what could happen with the evening. We've got that flexibility. It's not a rigid the-curtain-opens and this-series-of-events needs to happen for the show to make sense and come to some conclusion. Instead it's this nice woven piece that says here are some things that happened, here are some reflections, here is some music , here's a body in space moving. Hopefully at the end you're like, Oh, let's get around this circle and have a conversation."

She says GPTC producing artistic director Kevin Lawler gave her a "very open" script to take the event wherever she wanted.

"I'm excited about this project because it allows us to explore the concept that we're all performers with this urge to tell a story or to share this happening or to recount this thing that happened to us. But where's the platform for that? When do we get together and do it? What we're doing is throwing some artists and musicians and actors in the mix. It's engaging us as theater practitioners to not be so static in our art form and it engages the community to understand that theater isn't this other thing that happens on the other side of the city."

Featured storytellers include Nancy Williams, Felicia Webster, Peggy Jones and Dominque Morgan, all of whom will riff and reflect on indelible characters and places from North O's past and present.

Jazz-blues guitarist George Walker will lay down some smooth licks.

Member youth from the North Omaha Boys and Girls Club will present an art project they created. Works by Union for Contemporary Art fellows will be displayed.

Chapman sees possibilities for future North O programs like Tapestries that celebrate its essence. She says such programs are invitations for the public to experience art and own it through their own stories.

"Then you start having those conversations and then you realize the world is a lot smaller than you think it is," she says. "It just starts to close the gap. So yeah I think there's a real possibility for it to grow and create these little pockets of reminders that we're all performers and we all need our platforms for creation."

The May 29 South Omaha tapestry will take a similar approach in fleshing out the character and personalities of that part of town. The site is Omaha South High's Collins Stadium, 22nd Ave. and M Street. Director Scott Working, the theater program coordinator at MCC, says he's put together an event with "a little music, a little storytelling, a little poetry to let people know some of the stories and some of the history of the neighborhood."

He says he got a big assist from Marina Rosado in finding Latino participants. Rosado, a graphic designer, community television host and leader of her own theater troupe, La Puerta, will also emcee the program. She led Working to retired corporate executive David Catalan, now a published poet. Catalan's slated to read from three poems written as a homage to his parents.

Rosado also referred Working to artist and storyteller Linda Garcia. 

"I will be doing a storytelling segment based on my Abuelita (Grandmother) Stories," says Garcia. "The story I am telling is an actual story of my abuelita, Refugio 'Cuca' Hembertt, and my exposure to her insatiable reading habits. That led to my discovery and connection with languages and the power of words.*  

Even Louie M's Burger Lust owner Louie Marcuzzo has been marshaled to tell South O tales.

Also on tap are performances by the South High School Louder Than a Bomb slam poetry team, Ballet Folklorico Xitol, the Dave Salmons polka duo and a youth mariachi band. Working also plans to bring alive an El Museo Latino exhibit of Latinos in Omaha. Individuals will read aloud in English the subects' bios as a video of the subjects reading their own stories in Spanish plays. He says his inspiration for the evening's revolving format is the Encyclopedia Shows that local artists and poets put on.

"It's a combination of like standup and poetry and music and theater," Working says. "It's relaxed, it's fun. Plus, I don't think I could get David Catalan and Louie Marcuzzo to come to six rehearsals to get it right. I trust them."

Rosado embraces the format.

"I believe in the power of art. Music, dance, literature, theater and all cultural expressions can change a person's life. That's why I am so excited about the event. Scott has a genuine interest in showcasing the best of our community. Tapices is the word in Spanish for tapestries and I can hardly wait to see the unique piece of art that will be made at the end of this month."

Catalan feels much the same, saying, "Stories told as a performing art leave lasting impressions on audiences and motivate many to learn more about heritage and ancestry." He applauds Metro for its outreach to inner city Omaha's "rich cultural history in the transitional ethnic populations."

Lawler says Tapestries enables the conference "to be more rooted in the community," particularly underserved communities. "I wanted to go further into involving the community and being something relevant for the community. That's why I want to generate these stories from the community. It's kind of a lifelong quest I have to keep looking at the art form and saying, 'What are we doing that's working but what are we doing that's not working very well'  That's part of the reason the whole PlayFest is free. Theater is just priced out of society's ability to go. That doesn't work."

Just as Chapman feels Tapestries can continue to mine North O's rich subject matter, Working feels the same about South O. He adds that other neighborhoods, from Benson to Bellevue, could be mined as well.

Both the North O and South O events kick off with food, art displays and music at 6:30 p.m.  Storytelling begins at 7:30.

For the complete PlayFest schedule, visit www.mccneb,edu/theatreconference.

Read more of Leo Adam Biga's work at leoadambiga.wordpress.com.

posted at 10:29 pm
on Friday, May 10th, 2013

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