soul sisters

Michelle Troxclair and Felicia Webster host diverse nights

Soul sister poetesses Michelle Troxclair and Felicia "WithLove" Webster stir the pot to make the spicy mix of Verbal Gumbo, the spoken word series throwing down the third Thursday of every month at House of Loom.

The artists launched the series last fall at the invitation of Loom's Brent Crampton.

"Felicia and Michelle have brought a consistently diverse, experimental and truthfully honest night of poetry and performance. They're two very strong women in our community that have been really active in the social progressive and arts scene here," says Crampton. "They help us to live out our mission here with social issues and culture and bringing people together."

Gumbo's beats and hipsters fit right in at Loom, 1012 South 10th Street, with its music-dance cultural blends and crafted cocktails.

The spoken word sets are as diverse as the poets themselves. Some pieces are intensely personal. Others, political. Some call for action, others ask you to think.

The mic's evenly shared across genders and races, with people standing to deliver everything from private testimonies to slam spits to hip hop rhymes to indignant rants to preacher-like sermons to social justice screeds to inspired songs.

"This is a very open, diverse atmosphere and we're not in judgment of how people choose to be in the world," says Webster, an arts educator. "Diversity is how we present ourselves here. We're 'edutainers.' If somebody comes up and shares a poem about abuse, well that gives us an opportunity to have a conversation about it."

"Disseminating information that is going to charge people to heal, to change, to move, to educate, to motivate is also a part of what we do at Verbal Gumbo," says Webster. "The issues in the community we come from are very deep. There are a lot of wounds, some of them still open. Having a platform where you are not being judged for what you do or what you say or how you say it allows people to get up there."

"It's a healing. Like I have anger management issues and I have to write it and say it, it has to come out. It's a cleansing experience. And that's what a lot of people are using this for. People share things on this microphone they wouldn't share anywhere else. We're here to provide the platform for people to share and to be transparent and vulnerable," says Troxclair, a former arts and social services administrator.

Poet Ruth Marimo's raw story of surviving an abusive relationship, being arrested as an illegal alien and coming out as a lesbian has been embraced there. The Zimbabwe native and mother of two reels about the seemingly contradictory facets of her life in her intense yet whimsical piece, "Who Am I?"

I'm a stranger to my own mother,
A child with no parent,
A sister with no siblings,
An immigrant to this land,
An alien to my own nation,

Who am I?

I'm everything I'm not supposed to be,
A Lesbian who owns no cats,
A literate African,
An educated fool,
A voice that can't be silenced,
A turbulence that can't be calmed,
An answer that can't be found...

Marimo describes how for her Gumbo debut "both Michelle and Felicia really took me in with open arms and under their wings," adding, "Everyone has just been very supportive."

Troxclair says Marimo's "very tragic story that's had this phenomenal outcome" is among many stories of personal transformation told there.

"Sometimes someone will say something that someone needed to hear. That's how it works here. We're all about that," says Webster.

Judging, formally or informally, has no place at Verbal Gumbo.

Troxclair says, "Part of my housecleaning when I get up there is to say, 'It's difficult to come up here and put your soul and your life experience up on this microphone and so if you don't like what you're hearing be quiet.' We do not allow anybody to be criticized belittled or demeaned in any way. That's not what we're here for."

"When somebody's on the mic, we respect the mic," Webster likes to say.

"People are comfortable here," says Troxclair. "They feel loved, respected and honored and part of something bigger than just themselves. People who wouldn't set foot in a regular church, mosque, temple, whatever, say it's almost like church because it's an uplifting and spiritual experience."

"Verbal Gumbo is my nondenominational church," says Webster. "We're speaking life into words, we're breathing life into the experience. And we make everybody feel like family when they come in. There have been plenty of nights when I have needed to be lifted up. This is like my poetic-spiritual reciprocity. It feeds my soul, it mixes that gumbo pot up, adding spices when I'm needing a little cayenne pepper to get through."

Cultivating new artists like Marimo is part of the deal.

"We adopt people on a regular basis," says Troxclair. "I'm very much a mama and so I take in all strays. When people come in here and they share their stories we're like, 'You're family.'  We embrace everybody we come into contact with and we want to make sure everybody feels like this is a home."

Before her Jan. 17 Gumbo set Marimo said it herself. The author of the self-published 2012 memoir Freedom of an Illegal Immigrant says, "It's something I look forward to every month because it's such a welcoming space and it's diverse."

"The people who come through those doors come from such different backgrounds and are able to share their experiences and it feeds us for a number of reasons," says Troxclair, "The level of talent is one. It's always good to see talented people come and do what they do. Some of the things they talk about is another reason. They talk about everything from relationship stuff to political stuff to tragic life experiences. It's just edifying."

The styles and themes range from Marimo's lyrical reflections to Webster's old-school beatboxing to Developing Crisp's rap-style hooks to Nathan Scott's political history lesson to Paula Bell's black woman identity manifesto that ends with, "So you can take it or you can leave it, I really don't give a damn."

The audience of creatives sits at cocktail tables and cabanas or stands at the bar. Onlookers really feeling it lean into a performance. It's the epitome of Omaha Cool, complete with snapping fingers, knowing, nodding heads, raised drinks and adult conversation .

The women behind Gumbo have a long history celebrating The Word. Webster lays claim to organizing the metro's first spoken word series at the defunct Dazy Maze in the late 1990s. She then left for Philadelphia, where she and Davina Natanya Stewart formed the spoken word duo Daughters of the Diaspora. Troxclair hails from a family of storytellers and has written and orated since youth. When Webster returned to Omaha a few years ago Troxclair recruited her for the Poetry in Motion series she hosted at Loves Jazz & Arts Center.

The diversity and the vibe of Loom, the pair say, help set Gumbo apart from other spoken word venues and events here.

"It brings people from all walks of life and every community in one spot and everybody enjoys each other and respects each other's culture," says Troxclair. "We're open to all different kinds of audiences and artists."

Gumbo's wide-open aesthetic complements Loom's ultra laid-back scene.

"It's very chilled, very relaxed," says Webster. "The antique furniture, the vintage feel, the exposed brick, the music, the artwork, it's very eclectic. All of that creates the ambience that is totally different from any other place in Omaha. You feel like you're not in Omaha for one night. It's a whole other vibration. It's for grown-ups. There's this opportunity to be a part of a rich culture of artistic expression."

That expression may include music, dance, body painting and moving to whatever groove grabs you. Small community vendors are invited to promote their side hustle goods and services. Webster and Troxclair say Gumbo's also a networking-information forum, ala the black barbershop-salon, where community issues and events get discussed and personal problems get aired and vetted.

"It's a lifeline," says Webster.

The next Verbal Gumbo is Feb. 21. The event starts at 7 p.m. Admission is $5.

For series updates visit www.facebook.com/verbalgumbo.

Read more of Leo Adam Biga's work at leoadambiga.wordpress.com.

posted at 04:07 pm
on Friday, February 08th, 2013

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