PlayFest broadens theater possibilities

Events feature community-based, site-specific works

"We're kindred spirits with respect to the creation of performance and the creation of events to share with an audience," says Plourde, a New York director. "We create performance, we create live events, we work with groups of artists we consider artist-creators. There isn't a script.

We start with questions and territories of exploration and as directors we guide the exploration with a company to create what ultimately becomes a performance event."

Each year the conference recognizes a playwright and celebrates their work. During the May 28 Voices at the Center 2014 honored playwright Kia Corthron will read from a selection of her politically charged plays and be joined by local spoken word artists, actors and musicians speaking their own truths. Set outdoors at the Malcolm X Center, 3448 Evans Street, this gathering of raised social consciousness at the birth-site of the slain activist born as Malcolm Little is curated by Omaha Community Playhouse Education Director Denise Chapman.

This Neighborhood Tapestries event will intersect with issues affecting inner city communities like North Omaha's. The Harlem-based Corthorn will read from her new play Megastasis, which she says is "inspired" by the Michelle Alexander book The New Jim Crow in its look at "how the war on drugs has impacted the black community in such devastating ways." Chapman will direct an excerpt from her adaptation of ancient Greek theater, Women of Troy, that substitutes modern urban women "left behind" as collateral damage in the war on drugs. TammyRa, Zedeka Poindexter and Monica Ghali portray the Trojan women.

Corthron, who's written for television and has authored a novel, will read from at least two more of her plays: Trickle and Sam's Coming.

She recently won a $150,000 Windham Campbell literary prize.

She says she strives to affect audiences emotionally as a way to engage them and therefore "make them think and maybe reconsider or for the first time consider issues they hadn't thought about before." She says as a black woman writing about the black experience whatever she chooses to address in her work is bound to be militant in someone's eyes. "I feel like if you are part of a community that has been traditionally oppressed as the black community has been that…it's hard to write anything without it being somewhat political." In Corthron's view, wearing one's hair natural or not, having a light or dark skin tone and using slang or proper English all potentially become tense political-ideological points thrust upon and internalized by blacks. 

When Corthron's penning a play she says "'I'm just really conscious of and true to the world of these characters and to the way these characters would speak. That's sort of my driving force when I'm writing – their language."

The playwright's excited to have her characters' voices mix with those of The Wordsmiths, led by Michelle Troxclair and Felicia Webster, the poets behind Verbal Gumbo at the House of Loom, along with Devel Crisp, Leo Louis II and Nate Scott. Adding to the stew will be hip hop artists Jonny Knogood and Lite Pole. Chapman looks forward to this "battle cry music that speaks truths about what's going on in the community and offers platforms to start conversations for solutions." Corthron and her fellow artists will do a talk back following the show.

Gabrielle Gaines Liwaru is creating original mural art for the evening.

On May 30 PlayFest moves to the historic Florence Mill, 9102 North 30th Street., for Wood Music, an immersive event created by the writers, directors and actors of the New York-based St. Fortune Collective. Omaha's own Electric Chamber Music is composing original music. New Yorker Elena Araoz, is directing. Her husband Justin Townsend is designing the show with the conference's Design Wing fellows.

posted at 09:52 am
on Wednesday, May 21st, 2014

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