No. 300

A look back at Year Six…

Goddamn. Just look at that number. 300. Not all were as perfect as a bowling score, but still … that's a lot of friggin' words. And I haven't run out yet. It's hard to believe that six years ago Column No. 1, an interview with then-hot property Willy Mason, was published, Dec. 2, 2004. Golden-boy entrepreneur John Heaston and the work-hardened galley hands at The Reader have been kind enough to keep this page open to me all these years. Hopefully, there are many more to come. Don't believe all that putrefied tripe about the "death of print." Newspapers will be around long after that shiny iPad you're getting for Christmas has been recycled a dozen times by the good folks at PBR. So, as I crank out yet another recap and update of some of the "better" columns of the past year, I thank you, precious reader, for coming along for the ride, always willing to crack your window whenever the gas accidentally escapes. At the same time, I kneel before you, hat in hand, eyes turned downward, and beg you to send your column ideas via dancing electron to .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address). Your thoughts make my thoughts grow, and are the fertilizer that keeps this mighty tree sturdy as we enter year seven, just in time for Second Grade. Column 255: The Letting Go, Jan. 20, 2010 — We said goodbye to a pure garage-punk genius named Jay Reatard, who at age 29 was way too young to die. Jay's impact on our world is still being felt by all of us who value flash-brave creativity; and without a doubt, his spark will be felt long after we let him go. We're still letting go of The 49'r, its bitter demise remains fresh in our minds. When this column was published, the hopeful were organizing the "Save the 49'r" Facebook page, but I think we all knew better. They couldn't stop what many alleged was a case of politics over people. The lights went out in October. The wrecking ball awaits. F*** you, CVS, you overblown toilet-paper store. I'll never step foot in your fluorescent nightmare. And yes, Mr. Gray, voters will remember. Column 258: Long Live The Hole, Feb. 10, 2010 — In the dead of winter, all-ages basement punk club The Hole was forced to move out of its hole beneath the Convicted skate shop, across the street to the above-ground relic that used to house jaunty Omaha gay bar The Diamond. It looked like a new beginning for a venue that some thought could serve kids the same way the Cog Factory did in the '90s. But the location was too good to be true, and in September The Hole was dug up once again, forced to move to another basement, this time beneath Friendly's Family Bookstore in Benson, where it now resides. Probably. A glance at the club's Myspace and Facebook pages shows no listings for upcoming shows, and the sign above the club's alley entrance is gone. Columns 262 & 263: Austin Bound, March 10, 2010 — Why should local bands play at South by Southwest Music Festival in Austin? Little Brazil, It's True, Digital Leather, The Mynabirds, Thunder Power, Eagle Seagull and UUVVWWZ all gave their best reasons, which boiled down to: 1) exposure, and 2) fish tacos. Despite playing to crowds that ranged from a few to a few hundred, none of them got their "big break," but they did get king-sized hangovers and lots of memories. I haven't decided if I'm going back this year … Column 266: No Excuses, April 14, 2010 — It was an opportunity to point an accusatory finger directly at you, the local indie music community, and warn you that there were no excuses this time. None. The MAHA Music Festival line-up (Spoon, The Faint, Superchunk) and an ultra-cheap $33 ticket made sure of that. If Omaha really wanted a true indie rock festival, the beginning of a Midwestern Lolla or Coachella or Bonnaroo, it had to turn up at Lewis & Clark Landing this year. And you did, nearly 10,000 of you for what is now being rumored as the last Faint performance ever (though I'll believe it only when Todd tells me). Now comes word that an already crowded local music festival season is about to get more crowded next year. Will MAHA be able to get you to come out in 2011? Two words: Arcade Fire. Dare to dream. Column 267: Identity Crisis, April 21, 2010 — This bitter live review of Digital Leather's performance at Harrah's Casino was a chance to whine about how the band on stage only vaguely resembled the one heard on their amazing albums (Blow Machine, Sorcerer, Warm Brother). In hindsight, well, I had nothing to whine about. Digital Leather live is a filthy, punk factory that bleeds anger on its own level, regardless of whether I can hear the friggin' keyboards. If I want nuanced subtlety, I can always stay home and listen to the records (something we'll all get a chance to do when Digital Leather releases its latest work of art in 2011). Column 271: Comfort Zone, May 19, 2010 — Stephen Pedersen, Omaha's version of Buckaroo Banzai (high-fallutin' Kutak-Rock lawyer by day/Saddle Creek rock star by night) explained why he and the rest of the aging yuppies in Criteria are content to play only the occasional reunion show. In fact, the band hasn't played again since that Waiting Room gig in May. Instead, the esteemed counselor has his eyes set on a different sort of reunion -- this time with his old pals from seminal Nebraska indie band Slowdown Virginia, who are prepping to take the stage Dec. 23 at the club that (sort of) bears its name -- 16 years after their first show. I'm sure they'll all look and sound exactly the same. Column 277: A Modest Proposal, June 30, 2010 — David Fitzgerald from Athens, GA's Flagpole magazine did me a solid by writing a review of the debut album from It's True. Alas, his kind words weren't enough to keep the band alive, as the same evening the column hit the streets, It's True announced from stage its demise. So we said goodbye to one of Omaha's most promising acts … didn't we? Don't be so sure.

posted at 05:00 am
on Wednesday, December 08th, 2010

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