Laughing with Lachlan

Lachlan Patterson Finds Success on “Last Comic Standing”

At an early age, Lachlan Patterson knew that he would have to use his sense of humor to get him through tough situations. At the age of 19 he performed his first show at an amateur night in hishometown of Vancouver, B.C. After several years spent learning the art of standup comedy, Patterson started to find his stride and began touring throughout Canada, landing him at festivals like Montreal’s Just for Laughs, the Halifax Comedy Festival and the Aspen Rooftop Comedy Festival. His television appearances include “The Tonight Show with Jay Leno,” Comedy Central’s “Live at Gotham,” “Tosh.O.,” the FX comedy “Legit” and VH1’s “Sexiest Artists.” Patterson’s debut album Jokes to Make Love To made Rooftop Comedy’s top 10 in its first year and continues to be a major seller on Amazon and iTunes. In his free time, Patterson co-host’s his weekly podcast “The Kooks of Komedy,” with fellow comedian Joe Praino, where they discuss surfing, comedy and their personal lives. Lachlan is a finalist on this season’s “Last Comic Standing” appearing on each and every episode through Aug. 14, when the winner is announced live. The comic says appearing on LCS has already impacted his career in a big way. “For the first time in my life, people have been coming to my show because they want to see me as opposed to just see a comedy show,” Patterson says. “It’s always been a dream of mine to have people who know and understand my point of view in the audience and now, when my name is announced, I can tell by the applause that the audience actually knows who I am. It feels great. I feel more of a connection with the audience right away and it allows me the comfort to explore more on stage. And I get more money, which is cool.” Don’t miss your chance to connect with Patterson this weekend at Funnybone and check out our Q&A with the comic below:

When did you decide that you wanted to pursue a career as a comedian?

When I had tried everything else and failed miserably. Standup Comedy was the only thing I ever tried that I understood how to do right away. That and dancing, I’m a great dancer.

What does it take to get stage time at an open mic?

Anyone can sign up for an open mic but in L.A. and NYC you have to get there early to sign up. Some open mics do a raffle draw which gives every comedian an equal chance of getting up but ultimately it takes the desire to get really really good and hopefully become recognized for your efforts.  Or Money, you can also just buy a comedy club.

What have been some of your biggest challenges breaking into this career?

Probably one of the toughest challenges is going from a middle or feature act to becoming a headliner.  This transition was tough for me because I had to make it in Canada and in the US separately.  My general rule is: When you think you deserve something in this business, wait a year before you ask for it.

What is your process for developing material, do you ever hit a wall and how do you overcome that?

I’m always writing. Even when I’m not writing my brain is writing down things that are happening around me.  Someone asked me for driving directions the other day and my brain started to tickle. Who asks that anymore? He said “how do I get to 3rd street?”
I told him to take the second left into the Verizon parking lot and upgrade his phone.

Is there anything you have to carry with you or have on stage, any rituals you do beforehand?

I always have my setlist in my back pocket. I’ve been doing it since I started out of fear that I would freeze on stage and not know what to say.  I’ve never needed it before but it feels good to know it’s there.  I also like to meditate before I go onstage. Even just for five minutes to help me focus while I’m driving to the gig.

What impact would you say “Last Comic Standing” had for you, career wise and personal?

For the first time in my life people have been coming to my show because they want to see me as opposed to just see a comedy show. It’s always been a dream of mine to have people who know and understand my point of view in the audience and now, when my name is announced, I can tell by the applause that the audience actually knows who I am. It feels great. I feel more of a connection with the audience right away and it allows me the comfort to explore more on stage. And I get more money which is cool.

You are a very talented writer, do you write other pieces besides comedic?

I love writing all sorts of different things but I don’t usually share a lot of it because I’m shy I guess. Somewhere in my computer there’s a few rap songs and reggae songs as well as a bunch of characters I’m hoping to develop once I get the energy.

What or who has been an inspiration for you when it comes to life in general?

My dad. He taught me about hard work and what it takes to become great at something. He’s always been my coach in every sport I played.  He was my first mentor.

How would you describe your style and do you feel like it’s changed throughout your years of performing?

I guess my style is sort of a laid back sarcasm. It’s changed a lot though over the years.  As you get older I think you become more aware of your environment for better or for worse. I think I’m more affected by what I’m talking about now and it shows in my performances.

What would be your dream gig?

Performing comedy while touring the most beautiful surf breaks in the world. Sold out shows in Bali, Fiji, Australia, Costa Rica, New Zealand. That would be dope

What do you love doing in your free time, are there any other interests you want to pursue?

Surfing. I have a podcast called The Kooks of Komedy which I co-host with a fellow comedian named Joe Praino. We’ve been recording it in my garage and it’s been a lot of fun. We have a small following of “Kookheads” and we’re hoping to go on tour next summer if we can get the time off work.

What is your favorite kind of humor in other people?

I like watching people get hurt. It sounds terrible but sometimes I’ll just drift around on YouTube. Type in “Fail” on YouTube. You’ll love it.

What are you currently working on and where would you like to see yourself in a few years?

Currently I’m working on my next comedy special and I’m hoping to release it early next. Eventually I see myself writing and performing on various film and television shows including celebrity roasts. And of course, The Last Comic Standing Tour begins in September!


Lachlan Patterson: Thursday-Sunday, Aug. 7-10. Funnybone Comedy Club and Restaurant 17305 Davenport St, Suite 201, Village Pointe Shopping Center, $15-$20, THU: 7:30 p.m. FRI: 7:30 & 9:45 p.m. SAT: 7 & 9:30 p.m. SUN: 7 p.m., (402) 493-8036, funnyboneomaha.com

posted at 04:50 pm
on Wednesday, August 06th, 2014

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