Tokyo Police Club

Tokyo Police Club has nothing to do with Japan or the police; and it’s not a club, it’s a band. As if the name isn’t misleading enough, the band members are from Canada yet put out their debut album, Elephant Shell, with Omaha’s Saddle Creek Records in 2008. David Monks, Graham Wright, Josh Hook, and Greg Alsop have been playing together since the early 2000s, but have jumped around labels like it’s going out of style. Their latest offering, Forcefield, finds them with the New York City-based independent label Mom + Pop Music, which is also home to artists such as Sleigh Bells, Andrew Bird and Wavves. According to the always-positive reviews doled out by Pitchfork (sarcasm), “Forcefield is the only Tokyo Police Club album that appears to be in tune with prevailing trends. In case you haven’t realized it yet, indie rock is basically pop now and Tokyo Police Club seem energized by not having to pretend like their candy hearts don’t pump Kool-Aid.” Whatever the case, they hit the Omaha stage in all their pop glory this Saturday. — Kyle Eustice

Tokyo Police Club with Geographer, Said the Whale, April 19, at Slowdown, 729 N. 14th. St., 9 p.m. Tickets are $15. Visit http://www.onepercentproductions.com for more information.

posted at 03:33 pm
on Sunday, April 27th, 2014

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