Comedians United

The Campaign is a 90-minute middle finger to SCOTUS

It seems like an odd way to start a review for a movie in which Will Ferrell tries to make Zach Galifianakis touch his testicles on stage during a debate, but The Campaign has a clever message. Writers Chris Henchy and Shawn Harwell move beyond the standard skewing of attack-ad politics and candidates that are either incompetent or lecherous. Oh, sure, they have fun with the Scarecrow and the Cowardly Lion, but the villains are the ones shouting “pay no attention to the douchebags behind the curtain.” Those douchebags, of course, being Dan Aykroyd and John Lithgow.

This is a R-rated raunchy response to the Supreme Court’s Citizens United ruling, the one that reaffirmed companies are people and, because companies speak in the language of money, curbing their donations is an infringement on free speech. All you need to know about the reaction is that it is literally the one bipartisan conclusion the country has reached in forever: everybody hates it. So even if it seems like director Jay Roach’s consistently amusing election-year romp is a generic “stay true to yourself” political morality play, it isn’t. Stay through the credits if you don’t agree.

Although the affectations of incumbent Congressman Cam Brady (Ferrell) are pure George “Eight years was awesome, and I was famous and I was powerful” Bush, his flaw is purely Clintonian: he like-a the ladies. He and his campaign manager, played by the deadly-in-a-supporting-role Jason Sudeikis, expect to run unopposed in the general election. But when The Motch Brothers (Lithgow and Aykroyd) see a chance to manipulate the election in order to put a politician in their pocket who will vote to open a sweat shop in North Carolina, they sink their fortune into Marty Huggins (Galifianakis).

Huggins has a proud GOP family name, but is himself a friggin’ weirdo. So The Motches send master image craftsman Tim Wattley (Dylan McDermott) to fix up their would-be puppet. It’s not easy, considering that Huggins is prone to wearing a fanny pack and introduces himself to the political scene with a lengthy story about his pugs eating snacks under the couch. With Brady committing stupider and stupider transgressions, including punching a baby in the face, the race tightens and the laughs come loose.

Galifianakis is at his best here, doing the kind of comically nuanced version of method acting. He got laughs in one scene simply for how he sat down. That’s impressive. He has been neutered in other roles, but this is a reminder that when he can unleash his inner Andy Kaufman and go full Tony Clifton, things couldn’t be better. The same can be said for Ferrell, who is so often forced to be a eunuch of a leading man that it’s easy to forget he’s funniest when he lets it all hang out and gets mean.

None of it is sophisticated or original, but that doesn’t mean it’s not clever. There’s a reason the Motch Brothers rhyme with the Koch Brothers, the real-life billionaires influencing real-life politics with real-life money. And by the end of The Campaign, it becomes obvious that this isn’t politician versus politician but an “eff you” to Scalia and his gang. And working that message into a movie with jokes about defecation while getting tickled is always going to get a recommendation.

Grade = B+

posted at 04:05 pm
on Friday, August 10th, 2012

COMMENTS

(We're testing Disqus commenting (finally!); please let us know if you have trouble.)

comments powered by Disqus

 

« Previous Page


Yes, They Mean You

Thrill-seekers live for the rush that comes from defying death; adrenaline is the body’s chemical “thank you” for keeping it alive. Somehow, that’s the sensation I got watching Dear White People,...

more »


Fury Is Missing Fast

Inside of writer/director David Ayer’s Fury is a tight, 90-minute, “we will hold this line” war movie populated with complex characters and surprisingly good performances. Problem is, it was slipped...

more »


The Adventures of Super Vlad

Left out of the superhero movie party every other studio is throwing, Universal made the ballsy decision to turn Dracula into caped crusader. Gone are the prominent widow’s peak, goofy accent and...

more »


Everyone is Awful

Warning to newly engaged couples: Do not see Gone Girl, a movie that makes marriage look like The Hunger Games with slightly more alleged sodomy. Writer Gillian Flynn, adapting her own novel, filters...

more »


Swimming in the Laika

From Ray Harryhausen’s Medusa to Henry Selick’s Jack Skellington, stop-motion animation is just frickin’ cool, yo. Maybe it’s the meticulous nature of the art form, with each tiny gesture by a...

more »







Advanced Search