Striking and Sonorous

Sunday 22

STRIKING AND SONOROUS

Omaha Chamber Music Society concert

Dwight Thomas, timpani

Jeffery Nelson, percussion

Christi Zuniga, piano

Yulia Kalashnikova, piano  
First Central Congregational Church
421 S. 36th St., Omaha 1200 Douglas St.

3 p.m.

Tickets $5-$20

http://www.omahachambermusic.org/

Music of our time pulses in ways you might not expect in a chamber music concert. Clearly the centerpiece is Béla Bartók’s famed groundbreaker “Sonata For Two Pianos and Percussion.”  The keyboards mesh with varieties of drums and a xylophone in clusters of notes and rhythmic interplay where echoes of Brahms may resonate. Moments of intense energy contrast with intimations of contemplation and evocation of dance. Before that comes music by Ohio composers Scott Huston and Marshall Griffith. Huston’s “Quiet Movement, Kanon and Fantasy” is for two marimbas. His works for the Seattle and Cincinnati Symphonies and the St. Paul Chamber Orchestra put him on major musical maps. Griffith has Omaha connections. He’s a long-time good friend of the Symphony’s principal timpanist Dwight Thomas, one of the interpreters of church music mode- derived “Plagal Variations.” There’s a pre-concert talk at 2:40.

posted at 11:15 am
on Thursday, June 12th, 2014

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