Potash Twins

Called the “Twin Horns of Jazz” by NPR, Potash Twins are not only incredible jazz musicians, but self-proclaimed foodies, as well. Comprised of brothers Adeev and Ezra Potash, the Omaha natives blossomed in 2012 out of a mutual love for Wynton Marsalis (with whom they took several lessons from), coordinated clothing and of course, food. At a mere 20-years-old, the Potash Twins have done more in their short careers than many seasoned veterans. From performing at large concert halls in New York City and sharing the stage with Marsalis and fellow jazz great Jon Faddis to playing at Austin’s SXSW and participating in October’s TEDx Omaha event on the Creighton University campus, the boys are off to a promising start. In fact, they were recently appointed the role of “Artistic Directors” at the Love's Jazz and Arts Center in the historic jazz district of North Omaha. Their album, Twintuition, is out now. — Kyle Eustice

Potash Twins with Curly Martin Jazz Trio, April 19, at Love’s Jazz and Arts Center, 2510 N. 24th St., 8 p.m. Tickets are $15 for non-members and $10 for members. Visit http://www.lovesjazzartscenter.org for more information.

posted at 03:36 pm
on Sunday, April 27th, 2014

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