Lindsey Stirling

May 31

Lindsey Stirling

Sumtur Amphitheater, 11691 S 108th

8 p.m., $25-30

www.sumtur.org

(402) 597-2041

After being eliminated from “America’s Got Talent” in 2010, Lindsey Stirling could’ve let her dream of a career in music crumble. Instead, soon after her elimination, the “hip-hop violinist” took her case to the public and began posting videos of herself performing directly to YouTube. Millions of hits as well as critical acclaim soon followed, and now the classical crossover artist’s tour for her latest album, Shatter Me, is swinging into Nebraska with a stop at the Sumtur Amphitheater in Papillion. What should concert-goers expect? A little hip-hop, a little dubstep, and a whole lot of a dancing violinist backed by bandmates Drew Steen on drums and Jason Gaviati on keyboards. “Touring is a dream come true for me,” says Stirling. “I absolutely love the energy that comes from having a live audience. I feel like that energy brings out my best. It’s euphoric. There’s nothing like it. Granted I always get a little nervous right before I perform, but once I’m on stage there’s nowhere else I’d rather be.”

- Michael Cimaomo

posted at 11:44 am
on Saturday, May 17th, 2014

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