Theater gypsy returns with new show

Cantiello’s been making theater in Omaha for decades

Theater gypsy Gordon Cantiello is back in town again.

The stage veteran and former full-time Omaha resident teaches speech and theater at a private school in San Diego, Calif. When he lived here he put on dozens of plays from the early 1970s through the mid-'80s but made his biggest splash in 1992 when he produced and directed Beehive, an all-female rock 'n' roll musical revue that played 10 months at the Howard Street Tavern in the Old Market.

He revived the piece in 1996 and 2002 and again last year at The Waiting Room in Benson, when he gathered four original cast members in local divas Kathy Tyree, Tiffany White-Welchen, Ginny Sheehan Hermann and Sue Gillespie Booton.

"I've done a lot of different things in Omaha but without a doubt Beehive had the longest run," he says.

Now he's returned with another cabaret production he's visited before, Always…Patsy Cline, which begins a limited engagement at The Waiting Room on August 10 through his own Performing Artists Repertory Theatre. Erika Hall , who essayed the title part in an Omaha Community Playhouse production, portrays the country singer and Cantiello favorite Gillespie Booton plays fan-turned-friend Louise Seger.

Cantiello's been a player on the local theater scene since the East Coast native first came here in 1972 to head the theater department and teach part-time at Dominican High School. Prior to that he made the rounds in summer stock and Broadway auditions trying to make it as an actor. Though he got work going on all those cattle calls was difficult. He didn't like the "insecurity" of never knowing where his next job was coming from.

Fortunately, he listened to his parents and theater coaches and pursued his education. He earned an undergraduate degree in speech and theater from Ricker College (Maine), teacher certifications in Neb, and Calif. and a master's from Schiller International University in West Germany.

"I think I always knew I was a teacher and a director," he says.

When his gig at Dominican High ended he supported himself waiting tables while acting at Omaha's three dinner theaters – the Westroads, the Upstairs and the Firehouse. The old insecurity bug bit again and he wound up teaching speech and theater at Duchesne Academy from 1981 to 1986. With some prodding from Cantiello his brightest student, Tiffany White-Welchen, became a star performer at the Firehouse and later one of the stalwarts in his Beehive.

He left in '86 for San Diego, where he's lived and worked since, but he's never stopped reengaging with Omaha theater. He bought a home here eight years ago and plans making this his main residence and staging ground once he retires.

"I knew I liked Omaha when I landed here. There's just something about the city, the people that's friendly. It is my home, I love it here, I feel comfortable here, I feel accepted here. I feel the warmth of the people."

He's also found devoted followers for his brand of theater.

"My niche is cabaret. People miss the dinner theater experience, where the theater's sort of all around you and people can relax, have a cocktail, watch a show and have something to eat."

If his name is not readily familiar it's because Cantiello's never been affiliated with a single venue or two, Instead, he's freelanced from place to place. There may not be anyone who's put on such a variety of shows in such diverse locations in the metro.

He's did Side by Side by Sondheim and Celebration at M's Pub, The World Goes 'Round at the Jewish Community Center, Smokey Joe's Cafe at Harrah's Casino, Kathy Tyree and Friends at The Max, Oliver at the Omaha Music Hall, A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum at the Chanticleer Theater and the Lincoln Community Playhouse. He also did shows at funky spots no longer around, including The Ranch Bowl andt Frankie Pane's.

In addition to Beehive at the Howard Street, he did Always…Patsy Cline, Reunion and Studs there. His most prolific spot was the French Underground below the French Cafe, where he staged Jacques Brel, Ain't Misbehavin', The Belle of Amherst, Some Enchanted Evening, Dames at Sea and Side by Side by Sondheim.

Over the years he's worked with some of Omaha's top female stage artists and he admires them all: Phyllis Doughman ("a remarkable actress"), Kathy Tyree ("a wonderful cabaret performer with an incredible voice and personality people love"), Tiffany White-Welchen ("a great talent") and Sue Gillespie Booton ("I love her work ethic – she just jumps in"). There's also been Nola and Carole Jeanpierre, Patty Driscoll and now Erika Hall. 

"All those women are really talented."

He's counted many of them as friends. They appreciate what he's done for them. Tyree says Cantiello helped her "go to my next level as a professional entertainer," adding "He has very high expectations of us as performers. I love him as a friend and a producer and a director." She says she can always expect him to get intense when something's wrong. "That's the perfectionist in him. He wants it right."

None of his Omaha ties would have likely happened if he hadn't done summer stock at the Priscilla Beach Theater in Plymouth, Mass. An Omaha woman was the music director there but taught at Dominican back here during the school year. She let him know the school was looking for a theater director. After doing the New York thing again a real job sounded good and he applied and got hired at the school.

Another reason he's not a household name despite his many credits is that he's been mostly on the West Coast the last quarter century, only returning for those cabaret originals and revivals. He's reinvented himself several times but in the last act of his life he's content doing theater his way.

"It's a tough road but if you're passionate about it and do it there's nothing that can stop you, and I've done it and I'm proud of that."

That philosophy goes back to some career advice he got from theater legend Mary Martin, whom he was infatuated with from network television broadcasts of her iconic title role in the satge hit, Peter Pan.

"I wrote to her and she wrote back (with a signed 8 by 10 glossy of herself). She said, 'Billy Rose (famous impresario) once told me to go back to Texas and run a dance school and be a housewife. Had I listened to him I would never have had the pleasure of entertaining you and countless others. So go with your passion, go with your heart, and nothing can stop you.' It was very liberating and encouraging and to this day I have her picture hanging in my office, though I have to explain to my students who she was and all she did."

From the start, he could never get enough theater. As a young man he helped start a children's theater and at one point found himself doing four productions at once.

"I had all this energy. I loved it so much."

Today's Omaha theater community is different than the one he came to all those years ago. He likes the mix of viable companies and venues that's evolved.

"It surprises me that in Omaha there's so much and all the theaters seem to do well. Theater breeds theater. The more you have that, the better the community. I think Omaha may be ready to take that step of having a professional equity theater. It very well will happen I think."

He's even eying his own venue to host the kind of productions he's become best identified with. He'd like to offer classes, too.

For Always…Patsy Cline dates, times and tickets call 402-706-0778 or visit performingartistsrepertorytheatre.org.

Read more of Leo Adam Biga's work at leoadambiga.wordpress.com.

posted at 08:47 am
on Monday, July 29th, 2013

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