Omaha playwright comes into her own

Beaufield Berry comedy satirizes the girlfriend experience gone bad

Everything about one of Omaha's bright new playwrights bespeaks exotica, starting with her name, Beaufield Berry. This biracial, bicoastal creative with model good looks has worked as an actor, a singer, a VIP dancer, a burlesque performer, a mud wrestler and a horse ranch entertainment director.

She's into body-building. She's fallen in and out of love. She's suffered broken hearts and broken a few herself. She's written several plays, a novel, a television pilot and many poems. She's had works read at the Great Plains Theatre Conference. One ended up staged in New York. Another in Philadelphia.

Her self-described original full-length "dark comedy, Psycho Ex Girlfriend, is in the midst of a month-long run at the Shelterbelt Theatre, 3225 California St., where it continues through May 12. Playwright and former Shelterbelt artistic director Ellen Struve is a champion of Berry's work. So is new artistic director, ElizaBeth Thompson, who directs the show.

Fans of Omaha native author and playwright Rachel Shukert will find a similar satiric voice in Berry.

Berry calls her play's title character, Britte, a "crazy, kooky, quirky girl," adding, "Parts of the show I wouldn't say are autobiographical but I wouldn't say they're extremely foreign to me either. When I was writing the show I had myself kind of in mind. It was a really cathartic writing experience from beginning to end. I was sharing my writing as I usually do with my close, intimate friends, my best friend Katie Beacom-Hurst being one of them. So when it was done at the Shelterbelt Reading Series (in 2012) we had the luxury of hand-picking the cast and there was no one else I wanted to play Britte but Katie, someone who knows me inside out and has watched me take this journey."

Beacom-Hurst landed the same role in the current Shelterbelt production. Britte's best friends, KB and Didi, played by Katlynn Yost and Kaitlyn McClincy, morph into several more characters to create a Greek chorus. The boyfriend, Matt, is played by Nick LeMay, who also plays other male roles.

Berry started Psycho in 2010. By 2011 it lagged as she found herself stuck in a bad case of writer's block.

"It wasn't until I went to Central America by myself for two months on this soul journey to Guatemala, Nicaragua and El Salvador that I really had a breakthrough. Once I got out of my surroundings and got alone and foreign the show became really close to the play that's being performed."

Berry has another full-length play, He's Here, being considered for a month-long workshop by the Raven Theatre in Chicago.

It's a full resume for anyone, especially for the just-turned 29 artist who after years of flitting around has finally settled down. She has a real job at Omaha branding agency Rebel Interactive.

"I've always had a sense of independence, I've always been a do-what-I-want kind of person," she says.

Upon returning from Central America she says she felt "transformed." She's more purposeful than ever about doing her work and getting it produced. But like most writers she's beset by insecurities about the very thing she cares so much about.

"When it comes to writing it's the only thing I feel like I'm here for this reason, so it's very close, it's very personal. So it just scares me shitless whenever anybody even says anything good. I can't believe it."

Her play The Waiting Line about a cross-section of people awaiting organ transplants received an unusually strong response at its Great Plains reading.

"It was overwhelming. I walked in there with my mom and my best friend holding their hands, I was so scared. It was very emotional. It's nerve wracking for me to hear my words in actors' mouths. But that was by far the best response I've had to any of my pieces and I've had a lot of positive feedback on other shows. One of my panelists called the show 'raw and visceral, poetic and lyrical.' Whoa! What?

"I didn't set out to be any of those things, it just mused through me…"

Words tend to automatically flow through her. Like the poems she puts on Redbubble.

"I don't edit any of that, it all comes straight-out however it comes. Very organically. I feel like if I work it too much or think about it too much I'm going to take all the life out of it."

The feedback she gets from readings and workshops helps her hone her plays.

She's long had a writing gift though claiming it as her own has been another thing.

"It's hard for me to even say gift. I really don't know where it's coming from. I am a good writer but I can't think too highly no matter what somebody else says, no matter what I think because not everything is going to be accepted. I'm going to get rejection letter after rejection letter and that hurts. So I just take everything casually. I'm on pins and needles, every single goddam time."

Growing up she was steeped in creativity by her artist mother, Pamela Berry, who got Beau started in theater at 14. The home-schooled Berry got her experience at churches where her mom organized theater productions and through the Omaha scouting theater troupe, Explorer Post 619. She says working with the troupe "was a great experience. You got to write and direct your own shows. We did some awesome stuff and some really bad stuff, too. I happen to know a lot of people in the theater community from the Post – people I met there."

Her involvement with the Post ended around age 19, when the intrigue of dating took hold. She eloped at 20 and divorced soon after. Then in quick succession she put together a burlesque troupe, the Sparkling Diamonds, that opened for some bands before falling apart. She went off to Vegas, where she went by Carmen Rose. There, she formed a hip-hop dance group and relaunched a new version of Diamonds. She was doing off-strip table dancing when she wound up a paid mud wrestler at a club. She did a stint as a Miller Lite Girl.

What possessed her to lead this Reality TV life?

"Oh, it was Vegas, I was 21, I have no idea. I get bored extremely easily and I have to always be looking for the next big thing or something fun to do. I just want to try everything. Like there's no reason not to."

Love took her to New Jersey. Philadelphia became a regular haunt. She did some spoken word there. She appeared in a production of Cabaret. Through it all, she kept writing. Eventually her plays got readings in Philly and one, Ugly Birds, was performed at Spark Fest.

When her East Coast love affair went bad she went to Telluride, Colo., where she wrote The Waiting Line.

There was also a music sojourn in Calif. and various forays to Europe, Canada, Mexico. Her "traveling self" is so engrained that even though she's seemingly found in Omaha what she's been searching for she'll always be footloose and fancy free.

"I think the majority of my soul will never quite be settled anywhere and that's why I want to give myself the luxury of traveling to places and staying there for a few months spurt, so I can keep my foot in the world.

"What I really love about Omaha that I didn't find on either coast is there really is an opportunity to create your own world of whatever your art is. There's a lot of open doors here and if you're of an entrepreneurial spirit there's a lot of doors you can open yourself."

She's consiering forming her own theater production company.

For tickets to Psycho call 402-341-2757 or visit www.shelterbelt.org.

Read more of Leo Adam Biga's work at leoadambiga.wordpress.com.

posted at 09:53 am
on Friday, April 19th, 2013

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