Nik Fackler’s new film explores a paradise lost

Filmmaker’s Sick Birds Die East is a venture into the surreal

Filmmaker, musician and psychedelia aficionado Nik Fackler is a millennial seeker. It's no surprise then he followed his well-crafted made-in-Omaha feature debut Lovely, Still (2008) with documentaries exploring cultures half-a-world away.

One doc brought him to Nepal to capture the phenomenon of a boy buddha returned from remote self-exile back into civilization. That untitled film is as yet unfinished. The completed other doc, Sick Birds Die Easy, brought Fackler to Ebando Village in Gabon, Africa in 2011, to contrast ancient Bwiti culture with modern Western culture. 

After a taxing shoot and edit the visually-arresting Sick Birds hit festivals last year. Now it has a one-night screening at Film Streams. Feb. 11 at 7 p.m. Fackler will do a post-show Q&A.. He'll surely address the pic's self-referential depiction of privileged cultural tourists, namely himself and his crew, experimenting with Iboga and its well-known hallucinogenic effects and reputed healing properties and the surreal, self-indulgent weirdness that ensued.

Fackler intentionally encouraged mayhem – from giving every crew member a camera to not securing an interpreter to bringing along two addicts to working without a structure.

"Shooting the film was a complete disaster," he says. "I was setting up a disaster for myself because that's what I wanted it to be."

Mentor-producer Dana Atman reluctantly went and soon regretted it.

"He didn't want to do it," Fackler says of Altman, who's since taken a step back from filmmaking. "He had the hardest job. There's so much behind the scenes he had to deal with, like how difficult it was to get us fed and how the Ebando were constantly renegotiating how much money we needed to give them for their help. This was happening every day and it was all on Dana's shoulders. There were a lot of times he wouldn't come on set."

Back home, Fackler edited hundreds of hours of footage alone.

"Editing Sick Birds was hell. It was like taking a pile of chaos and making order out of it. It's definitely a film made in the editing room.

"I didn't know what documentary editing was going to be like. I should have known it would take a lot longer than narrative. It's a really tough process."

The project's harsh realities – everyone got wasted and sick and relationships were strained – humbled Fackler. But playing God still comes with the territory. In voice-over narration and interviews he makes clear he sought to find in Gabon a lost Eden that is the antithesis of the West. From his POV America is a sick nation that destroys the indigenous cultures it touches. In this first-person, Werner Herzog-like immersion into a strange land he shows the collision of two cultures and the inevitable spoiling and corrupting of paradise.

Even though he says off-camera, "This is not the film I meant to make," he clearly manipulates things to arrive where he intended to be.

The set-up finds Fackler enlisting two addict friends for the journey. Small farmer-actor-comedian Ross Brockley spouts paranoia, conspiracy theories and anti-Semitism. He ostensibly goes to kick his heroin habit. Musician-poet-alcoholic Sam Martin goes as the company's resident "minstrel" and acerbic archival of Ross. In Gabon the team meets Tatayo, a French expatriate initiate in Bwiti spiritual practices whose gone jungle wild with mysticism, ritual and drugs (think Dennis Hopper in Apocalypse Now).

We appear to see Fackler and his on-screen crew, all playing versions of themselves, shooting a doc. Fackler is the intrepid writer-director seemingly intent on getting his film at any cost. But the film was actually lensed by Lovely, Still director of photography Sean Kirby, who's unseen and only referred to in the credits.

Fackler acknowledges some dramatic moments in his film-within-a-film were staged. Given this odd melange, which he calls "a hyper creative" hybrid of documentary and drama, he may field some tough questions from purists who prefer more definition or transparency.

So is Sick Birds real or contrived?

"It's all those things," he says. "What's real is the guts of it, the history and Bwiti, my interviews with Tatayo, the Iboga ceremony, Ross getting up in the middle of it and yelling at Tatayo. None of that was planned. When you see us all fucked up on Iboga and tired we really are fucked up and tired. That's pretty accurate. That was part of the disaster."

Real or not, the film indicts self-indulgent Westerners running amok in a pristine land.

Fackler says he did assemble an edit where he revealed "it was all fake" but he preferred the "enigma of weirdness and questions." That other version, he says, "didn't spawn any questions or conversation, but when people thought it was real it spawned this wave of conversation. I loved that."

"The lesson I learned is that the more you research the great enigmas you're going to get more questions. There are no answers."

Besides, he adds, "Bwiti is a trickster culture and the film itself is a trickster film. It's not a traditional film. It's not one that is safe in any way. What I like about the art of filmmaking is you can take people to a place and attempt to put them in a mind-altered state. I like mind-altered states. I like to show there's more to life than just your current perception."

With Sick Birds Fackler tried breaking from hidebound filmmaking.

"There's different ways of doing film. I did the music video thing (for Saddle Creek Records label artists), and I did the narrative feature thing and learned about using my intuition through that. I'd go to set every day with Lovely, Still with a shot list and by the end of shooting I didn't have anything, I was just showing up on set and looking at everything and saying, 'OK, this is how to shoot this scene.' This (Sick Birds) was an extreme version of that."

Even though no one's "saved" in the end, Fackler says, "I really believe in Iboga and I've seen it work for people. But I learned you can't change people. If anything, Ross has gotten even more paranoid."

Fackler, an alternative health advocate who's experimented with his share of drugs, hopes his film's depiction of wayward Westerners doesn't distort the path of fellow travelers seeking enlightenment and cure,

"I wouldn't want Ebondo Village to get flooded with 18 year-olds dropping acid. though psychedelic tourism is happening. I don't want to be promoting this type of behavior. I was trying to expose it. I don't want to hurt Bwiti's cause or this underground movement of trying to heal drug addicts."

Fackler's glad for the experience.

"Lovely, Still is very much the film of a child and Sick Birds Die Easy is the film of a rebellious teenager. This film is very much about me growing up and the harsh hit of reality, the fear, not having answers to anything, rising from that dark night. I think it was a very important step for me as a filmmaker. I feel I succeeded making a film that could have been given up on. I'm proud of it."

As for what's next, he says, "The art you're making is directly connected to the searching you're doing within yourself. As long as I don't stop searching I will be making art. That's my way of understanding what I'm searching for."

For tickets, visit www.filmstreams.org.

Read more of Leo Adam Biga's work at leoadambiga.wordpress.com.

posted at 12:27 pm
on Monday, January 27th, 2014

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