Back Beat

Omaha Performing Arts’ 1200 Club at the Holland Center returns Nov. 3 with singer-songwriter/storyteller Jeff Daniels. In 2007 Daniels was the first performer to grace the stage at the cozy, intimate series, where he played to a sold-out crowd in the Suzanne and Walter Scott Recital Hall. I interviewed Daniels ahead of that performance and he remains among the most sincere, genuine artists I’ve spoken with. Many know Daniels best for his eclectic acting career: he’s done everything from the tense and touching — The Squid and the Whale, Terms of Endearment — to the absurd — Space Chimps, Dumb and Dumber (And who could forget Welcome Home, Roxy Carmichael? Actually, I think everyone but me.) But don’t confuse him with the Paris Hiltons of the iTunes catalogue, or any misplaced music career wannabes. Daniels has been playing and singing since the ’70s, and his musical talent is as genuine as he is. He uses the musical compartment of his career to help fund The Purple Rose Theatre, an equity theater he started in his tiny hometown of Chelsea, Mich. “It’s all me. I write it, I perform it, I direct it, I cut it and I edit it. I change it on the fly,” Daniels says of his music. “There’s a wonderful freedom that comes with being creative on your own and I like that a lot.” Look for an all-new interview with Daniels in next week’s Reader. Just after he kick-starts the series, the 1200 Club will host the Chicago Blues Reunion Nov. 4, and Cherry Poppin’ Daddies Nov. 5. For the full lineup visit omahaperformingarts.org. Lincoln’s live electronica quartet, Somasphere, released a full-length album this month. Sine Language is available for free download at somasphere.bandcamp.com. Wednesday, Oct. 13, many of us were glued to the news as the notorious 33 Chilean miners who’d been trapped 2,000 feet below the surface for 69 days were rescued, one by one. The Pixies were performing that night in Santiago. As spellbound and inspired by the story as the rest of the globe, the band played its longest set ever in support of the miraculous liberation: 33 songs for 33 miners. “We found out five minutes before we went on stage that all of the miners had safely reached the surface,” says Black Francis, in a press release. “This was definitely one of the most meaningful shows we’ve ever played.” Muy bueno. Backbeat takes you behind the scenes of the local music scene. Send tips, comments and questions to backbeat@thereader.com

posted at 01:08 pm
on Wednesday, October 20th, 2010

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