Ashford reflects on lost mayoral bid

Eyes possible future statewide run

State Sen. Brad Ashford's poor showing in the April 2 Omaha mayoral primary isn't deterring him from future elected office bids.

The one-time Democrat and long-time Republican ignored advisors and ran as an independent against major party-backed opponents. He garnered 13 percent of the vote in a low turnout, off-cycle election. Though officially a nonpartisan race the two candidates who advanced as finalists to the May 14 general election, Omaha City Councilwoman Jean Stothert and Omaha Mayor Jim Suttle, are a registered Republican and Democrat, respectively.

Ashford also finished behind Republican Dave Nabity and barely ahead of another Republican, Dan Welch. He concedes his independent bid against a stacked deck was a miscalculation.

"I was warned, I didn't believe it," Ashford says. "With three Republicans in the race all spending over $300,000 in the campaign it drew a tremendous number of Republican voters to the polls. I think that was really it. The three candidates were really pushing. I didn't see that, I saw them canceling each other out and in effect it increased the turnout. From a political strategy point of view we just didn't anticipate the onslaught of Republican voters."

He feels abysmal voter turnout east of 72nd Street hurt him. He criticizes off-year elections for city council and mayor as "inane," adding, "What it does is give special interests and big contributors much more sway in what happens than is appropriate." He intends introducing a bill in the Unicameral next year to place the city elections on the same cycle as county and presidential elections.

Despite the disappointing finish, he says, "I'm still very much interested in running for another office. I'm energized by the people. I think my interests at this point would be to run for some sort of statewide race. I'll look at what options are available."

Should he decide to test the waters he says, "I'll again confront the question, 'Can you run as an independent? George Norris (the legendary early 20th century Neb. politician) did it. That's a long time ago. But I still think there are numbers of voters who are dissatisfied with partisan gridlock and so, yeah, I will look at a statewide race."

Ashford, whose current legislative term concludes at the end of 2014, when term limits force him out, doesn't like being bound by party politics.

"I don't think party hardly at all. It never enters my mind and it never did when I was running as a Republican. I certainly didn't think about the Republican platform, most of which I don't agree with on social issues.

"I'm a social justice guy. I'm into inclusivity. I'm unabashed in that regard. I support gay rights. I've supported gay rights since the '80s when I worked on hate crimes legislation. On immigration I've always supported a pathway to citizenship for immigrants who are here."

As head of the Omaha Housing Authority he supported efforts to get residents into their own homes. As a state senator he's supported prenatal care for immigrant women. he changed his view from pro-death to anti-death penalty and he's sought ways to limit illegal guns on the street. As a candidate he advocated for a career academy serving inner city youths. As a legislator he's working on overhauling a juvenile justice and detention system he describes as "in the dark ages."

He says he considers his views "more pro business" than liberal. "The more people that are part of the American Dream the better the country is, the more business that's being done.". He favors merging city-county government and building stronger relationships between the Omaha Mayor's office and the Legislature.

This state representative from District 20 in Omaha hails from a legacy family that did well in business (Nebraska Clothing Company) and championed diversity. His grandfather Otto Swanson helped form the state chapter of the National Council of Christians and Jews (now Inclusive Communities). His grandfather's example made an impression.

"I think he just instilled in me this whole sense that you've got to always be making sure people are not discriminated against and I think Omaha still has vestiges of discrimination. I think we're a segregated city, certainly as it relates to African Americans. We're paying the price for it."

He says his campaigning showed him "people are excited about Omaha but they don't understand why we have such restrictive laws on gay rights. I know the vast majority of people I talk to support much more progressive policies when it comes to immigration and gay rights and other things. I think people are more progressive on social issues than what politicians give them credit for.

"I think the more you stand up for those issues forthrightly the more people will follow you. The public is looking for people who are willing to take a tough stand. You can't be wishy-washy. I think it's incumbent upon someone like myself to continue the effort, to team up with other progressive people."

He's not looking for a political appointment from whomever wins the mayoral seat.

"I like both Jim Suttle and Jean Stothert. I wish them both well. But I would not be interested in any kind of appointment. i have to be out there mixing it up running for office and trying to get my ideas out there. I don't want to be subsumed by somebody else's ideas."

Read more of Leo Adam Biga's work at leoadambiga.wordpress.com.

posted at 07:05 am
on Monday, April 15th, 2013

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