Hard Times for Soft Drinks

* There’s a new chef behind the stoves at Marks Bistro in Dundee, as Jon Seymour recently took over for the departed Steve Bolen. While this is Seymour’s first executive chef gig, it’s not his first time in the kitchen: he’s spent time at V. Mertz, Spencer’s and the Grey Plume as well. Interestingly, Seymour also spent some time earlier this year working with Chef Rene Redzepi at his restaurant NOMA. That’s big news — NOMA was recently named the best restaurant in the world, and Redzepi’s doorstop of a cookbook showcasing his unique approach to molecular gastronomy, if that term even applies to his unusual cuisine, is up for a James Beard Award. What all this means for...

entered on 03/30/11 at 09:31 PM | read more »


<p>7M Grill owner Graeme Swain says the fish tacos (pictured above) are his restaurant’s most popular dish. </p> Magnificent Seven

7 Monkeys has become the 7M Grill, but much has changed beyond this minor name adjustment. 7M Grill is now more of a restaurant than a bar, thanks to a new menu and a different business approach. 7 Monkeys opened at 158th & Maple in 2006, and was one of the first restaurants I reviewed for Dish. It was an upscale lounge that offered a relatively adventurous menu for this chain-dominated part of Omaha. Graeme Swain purchased 7 Monkeys last year and reopened it as 7M Grill in November. My wife and I visited on a busy Saturday night. We started with the 7M Ceviche ($7.99), because the menu boldly declared, “We guarantee you’ll love this starter.” It offers tilapia, mangoes,...

entered on 03/30/11 at 08:31 PM | read more »


Urban Homesteading

*Spring is traditionally a time of planting — getting the herbs and vegetables arranged and settled in so you can begin reaping rewards by the time summer really hits its stride. But for others, “planting” takes on a whole new meaning. Homesteading has been around since, well, the country began; but it’s undergoing something of a renaissance. Whether that’s due to tea partiers, agribusiness, the economy or all those things, publishers are responding in kind. This spring we’ll see a deluge of books devoted to becoming self-reliant when it comes to food. Even if all you have is just a window planter, you’ll find plenty of ideas. The two words city dwellers will want to look...

entered on 03/23/11 at 09:53 PM | read more »


Approval of Stamps

At the end of the film Food, Inc., white words flash onto and fade into a black screen. The words, simple but poignant and, in some ways, naïve, encourage communities to advocate for the use of Food Stamps, now called EBTs or SNAP benefits, at Farmer’s Markets. The concept is a good first step to providing avenues of access to fresh fruits and vegetables for those struggling with food security. As of 2010 only 1.5 percent of farmer’s markets in Nebraska accepted Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program benefits, much lower than the still dismal national average of 7.5 percent. The problem with accepting SNAP benefits is that food stamps are no longer booklets of coupons. They are...

entered on 03/21/11 at 07:55 PM | read more »


Special Lenten edition!

Welcome to this special Lenten edition of Crumbs. Midtown sweets-lovers have two new options with last week’s opening of the shared Cold Stone Creamery/Rocky Mountain Chocolate Factory space in Midtown Crossing, both offering rich, high-calorie goodness sure to tempt those who've decided to reacquaint themselves with fruits and vegetables until Easter. Venue Restaurant at 70th and Pioneers in Lincoln will host a four-course chef’s dinner on Wednesday, March 23 featuring fish sourced from south Pacific waters. Ahi tuna three ways, grilled squid salad and grilled marlin are just some of the featured dishes. The event starts at 7 p.m. and is $50 per person. For more information or to...

entered on 03/17/11 at 03:45 PM | read more »


<p>Some of the options available at George Paul Vinegar in Cody, Neb. </p> Like Nothing Else

I woke after a few hours of sleep on the first Saturday in January to drive from Omaha six hours west to ranch country, to visit a man who makes artisanal vinegar. I was affectionately referring to it as the vinegar pilgrimage among friends, family and seven people from Metropolitan Community College’s Institute for Culinary Arts who accompanied me. Even that weekend’s dour weather forecast didn’t squelch our enthusiasm. We loaded into a sports utility vehicle and one of those oversized trucks with four doors and an extra-long bed, thankful in the end when it snowed eight inches. I had met George Johnson of George Paul Vinegar at the Emerging Terrain dinner for 500 in October. The...

entered on 03/16/11 at 10:28 PM | read more »


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