Two Old Market fixtures celebrate milestones

Signature Old Market spot M's Pub celebrates 40 years in business this year. It's a milestone for any independently owned restaurant. But reaching four decades takes on added meaning because when M's opened in 1973 (a planned 1972 opening was delayed), the fledgling Market's survival looked unsure.

The Market though went from counter culture social experiment to mixed use success story. M's owners Ann Mellen and Ron Samuelson doubly appreciate a thriving Market as their highly reviewed eatery is a fixture along with a second respected restaurant they own there, Vivace, which marks its 20th anniversary this fall. The establishments are emblems of the district's sustainability and growth.

The well-connected woman who founded "M's" and was its namesake, the late Mary Vogel, wanted to be part of the emerging Market scene. She commissioned world-class designer John Morford to transform the former Sortino Fruit Company warehouse into a sophisticated, cozy environs inspired by her favorite dining-drinking nooks from around the globe, particularly the pubs of England and Washington DC. Some argue M's is more bistro than pub but whatever it is M's owns a reputation for quality food, superior service and laid-back charm that's both cosmopolitan chic and homespun Midwest.

The small space is dominated by a three-sided green marble topped bar, exposed white brick work, a high ceiling, large mirrors, which make the room seem bigger, and picture windows that provide a glimpse of 12th Street on the east and peer into Nouvelle Eve on the south. The open kitchen is about the size and shape of a train's dining car and overflows with activity, though the culinary action mostly happens in the downstairs prep rooms.

"It's just a great open plan," says Samuelson. "Timeless. And that's why we don't change anything about it because we see a lot of fads come and go and as tempting as you might be to say, 'Well, it seems like that's what everybody's doing today � maybe we should try that,' it's not going to work here."

M's is indelibly of the Old Market. Like its neighbor shops it resides in a historic, 19th century building that exudes character earned with age. It adheres to tradition. It pays attention to detail. Its personality can't be replicated or franchised.

"I don't think we could take our sign and throw it in a place out west or anywhere else really," Samuelson says. "I just don't think it would transfer."

The affable, attentive, knowledgable wait staff wear crisp white and black uniforms with none of the attendant starch.

Samuelson says, "We've worked really hard for a really long time to position ourselves as a place where you can come sit by side with the table that has a $150 bottle of wine and a couple steaks and you can have a beer and a Greek sandwich and not be treated any differently by the waiter. A lot of our people have been around here for a really long time. We have people that we trust."

When Vogel sold M's in 1979 to Mellen's parents Floyd and Kate Mellen she stayed on as hostess and matriarch. Ann Mellen began working there around then and she soon grew fond of this force of nature.

"She would sit at the bar every day after lunch and count how many drinks we sold," Mellen says of Vogel. "She was a trip. A very energetic lady, very world traveled, very knowledgable, very opinionated. But very helpful � when things went wrong here she knew who to call.

"She had a passion for this place. She knew exactly what she wanted it to be and she did it right. She totally designed M's after her favorite places all over the world. She was like the mother of M's pub. It was her baby."

Market pioneer Roger duRand writes:

"Mary Vogel was a dame, A socialite with a heart of brass (polished). Mary was equal parts Mayflower pedigree, finishing school gloss and ribald cocktail raconteur. When she courageously cast her lot with the Old Market demimonde of 1972, she found a welcoming environment among the artists and adventurers. Her vision of a tearoom for 'ladies who lunch' that doubled as a bistro for 'lads who lust' became the elegant and reliably satisfying M's Pub that remains little changed from its first days."

Samuelson, who went to work there in 1986 after restaurant experience in Omaha, Texas and Colorado and then quickly partnered with Mellen, admired Vogel's "indomitable spirit," adding, "I think she was way ahead of her time. I think that's probably why she got along with the Mercers so well. They needed people like that to incubate ideas and to establish a core of anchor businesses."

Mellen's parents, who'd never operated a restaurant before, bought it with the intent of their restauranteur son Joe running it  but when he passed Ann stepped in to lend her folks a hand. Her passion for the business bloomed.

"I liked working for myself basically," says Mellen, a University of Nebraska-Lincoln journalism grad who worked as a reporter and advertising copywriter before M's.  "Then I came here and never left."

She and Samuelson pride themselves on being hands-on owners. One or the other  or both are at their restaurants most days. A tunnel connects the two sites.

Though an institution today, M's first decade was a struggle.

"Times were hard," she says. "The Old Market was a totally different place then. The Omaha (homeless) mission was just up the street. A lot of people were afraid of the Old Market. But even then it had a family, neighborhood feeling and I liked that a lot."

"It gets under your skin," Samuelson says of the Market.

By the early '80s, Mellen determined the Market was here to stay.

"It just got busier and busier and we saw more tourists coming to the area. You could just tell it was an exciting, upcoming area."

She and Samuelson, both Omaha natives, make a good team.

"We're a good fit personality-wise and professionally," he says. "We share the same passion for the Old Market and the same visions and goals for M's and Vivace. It's rare we have a disagreement about and when we do we do it respectfully."

"I don't want to seem like an old married couple but a lot of people think we're married. We're not," says Mellen.

She does all the books. An acknowledged foodie, he deals more with the culinary side. Both partners enjoy engaging with people.

"We feel the same way about how to treat people � our clientele as well as our employees," he says.

The fierce devotion of M's regulars is appreciated but it can be too much.

"Somebody who's been coming here for awhile may have an opinion about what you're doing and if you don't take their advice you can ruffle some feathers that way," says Samuelson. "We listen to people a lot and we always end up making decisions based on the good of the whole, which I think is responsible ownership."

He says that with M's "in good hands" he and Mellen decided to launch Vivace in 1993 " to fill a gap we saw in the landscape of the restaurant scene in Omaha for Mediterranean-influenced Italian food. We wanted to fill a niche for the community but also complement what we do at M's." He's proud of its pasta and pizza.

Vivace's larger space is perhaps warmer than M's but not as intimate.

Executive chef Bobby Mekiney is in charge of both kitchens. "He's young and kind of bridges the generation gap for us in a lot of ways," says Samuelson. "He's as talented a guy as we've ever had here. He makes it work."

Samuelson's proud that M's Pub and Vivace express the same "meticulously adhered-to, single-minded vision of passionate, locally-owned" venues that make the Market "a community treasure."

For hours and menus, visit http://www.mspubomaha.com and www.vivaceomaha.com

posted at 06:18 pm
on Monday, January 14th, 2013

COMMENTS

(We're testing Disqus commenting (finally!); please let us know if you have trouble.)

comments powered by Disqus

 

« Previous Page


HuTong Sushi Grill

As you read this, you are sitting (or standing, or unicycling; I don’t judge) approximately 5,761 miles from the nearest ocean. That’s right, I did the math. Yet somehow, Omaha manages to have a...

more »


Meet Me at Marks

Any proper crisp fall afternoon should include a leisurely stroll, crunching through the leaves on the streets of Dundee. That said, any dewy spring day or hot summer night should include a similar...

more »


Taco Tuesday, Wednesday and Sunday?

I searched high and low for the best tacos in the area. After running around all over town, I now present to you my two new favorite places for tacos.

Mula – Trendy Tacos

I went to Mula with my...

more »


Home Is Where the Havarti Is

Wisconsin is cold. Just the name of the state conjures images of snow, ice fishing and other cold stuff. And perhaps due to this extreme temperature, the people of Wisconsin know how to be warm....

more »


Farnam House Brewing Company

The first thing I noticed when I started talking to Tony Thomas about Farnam House Brewing Company is that he had a look on his face that I recognize. It’s the same face artists make when they create...

more »







Advanced Search