Terence “Bud” Crawford in the fight of his life for lightweight title

Lightweight contender from Omaha’s mean streets looks to make history

As Omaha glories in Creighton Bluejays hoops superstar Doug McDermott's historic season, another local sports figure going for greatness flies under the radar.

Top Rank boxer Terence "Bud" Crawford challenges for the WBO lightweight title March 1 against champion Ricky Burns in the title holder's native Scotland. The scheduled 12-rounder is being televised in the States by AWE, a hard to find cable-satellite network. The fight is scheduled for 2 p.m. (CST).

The CU campus McDermott's put on the map is mere few blocks from The Hood Crawford grew up in and where his recently opened gym, B & B Boxing Academy, 3034 Sprague Street, is located. But these two stars might as well be worlds apart. McDermott's a product of white privilege. His biggest challenge was deciding whether to return for his senior year or sign an NBA contract. The African-American Crawford is a product of the inner city. He grew up fighting in the streets and getting kicked out of schools. On the eve of his first pro bout he was shot in the head on the same mean streets of his youth.

McDermott, soon to be a three-time All-American, is the consensus  favorite to win national player of the year honors. He competes before 18,000 adoring home fans. Crawford's compiled a 22-0 record, 16 by knockout, yet he's never once fought professionally in his hometown though he trains and resides here. Where McDermott excels at a team sport embedded in popular culture, Crawford toils at a lone wolf game that's lost traction in this mixed martial arts age. While McDermott's every move is celebrated and scrutinized, Crawford operates in relative obscurity. Unless you follow boxing on HBO, you've likely not seen him fight and until reading this were oblivious to his upcoming title shot. 

Decades ago, when boxing still mattered in places like Omaha and when there weren't alphabet soup titles with deluded value, Crawford's world championship bid would have been big news. Still, just getting in this position should be cause for celebration today. If he prevails in Glasgow – oddsmakers and experts give him anywhere from a decent to an excellent chance – he'd be the first major boxing champ from Neb. since heavyweight Max Bear in 1934. The last time a local fought for an undisputed title was 1972, when Ron "The Bluffs Butcher" Stander met heavyweight king Joe Frazier at the Civic Auditorium and got bloodied like a stuck pig for his trouble.

Co-manager-trainer Brian "BoMac" McIntyre feels Omaha's not embracing this historic moment involving one of its own. He says given the way Crawford represents by proudly identifying his hometown on his trunks and giving it props in interviews, it's a shame Omaha doesn't "stand up" for him in return. If that lack of love bothers Crawford the hard-as-nails pragmatist with washboard abs isn't admitting it. He's aware boxing is dead here and he's intent on reviving it. He did soak up support from friends, family and well-wishing fans at a send-off party at Brewsky's before Team Crawford left Feb. 22.

Ask what winning a world title might mean to his community and Crawford answers, "Honestly, I really don't know because Omaha is really big on MMA, Creighton and Nebraska and nobody really talks about boxing that much. I feel if I was to bring that title back here it could boost us or it could just stay the same, where like a handful of people acknowledge what just happened and the rest are still like, Oh, it's just boxing.

"We've got a lot of talent in Omaha but a lot of people give up because of no resources and backing. As a professional you have to go to your opponent's backyard because we don't really have professional boxing in Omaha. I can't remember the last time we had a full professional boxing card in Omaha. It's real down here, so it's real hard to get motivated on boxing."

He hopes his academy does for youth what the CW Boxing Club where he started and still has ties did for him and many others.

"We want to help kids that need help with that father figure in their life by talking to them, teaching them to stay in school and listen to their parents and elders, things like that. A lot of kids in the neighborhood don't have nowhere to be after school. They can just come in here, relieve some stress, relieve some anger. We don't know what's going on in their household. They might be going through a lot and boxing might be the outlet to relieve some of that rather than doing something they'll regret the rest of their life."

Crawford hasn't let Omaha's tepid interest hold him back.

"You know what, he don't give a f___ about that, I swear to God he don't," McIntyre says. "He looks at it like, 'If they do get behind me so be it, if they don't, oh well.' They really weren't behind him when he was an amateur and now that he's here they're really still not behind him. That's just more fuel to the fire to win the fight."

McIntyre, a Team Crawford member since the fighter was a top amateur for the CW, whose namesake Carl Washington discovered the young scrapper, says Crawford's always fought an uphill battle for respect. As a teen Crawford's hot temper made him a handful. After some false starts, CW coach Midge Minor took him under his wing.

"I was a bad kid, when I came in I was just rough, I didn't care about training, nothing, I just wanted to fight," recalls Crawford. "Midge would throw me in there with anybody, he didn't care. Sometimes I'd get beat up, sometimes I'd win. The thing that separated me from everybody else was if I got beat up by one of the older kids I'd come back the next day like, 'I want to spar him, I don't want nobody else but him.' And Midge would be looking at me, 'You've got heart, I like you.' So I'd get in there and keep sparring until I started beating them. I think that's what really elevated me to where I'm at."

Minor, who's old enough to be Crawford's grandpa, has been the main wise counsel and steadying influence for the fighter.

"Anytime I needed anything or needed someone to talk to he was always there," Crawford says. "He's played a big factor in my life. He's a great father figure in my life."

Following stints at alternative schools, Crawford finally found a home at Bryan High School, where he graduated, Despite great success as an amateur, his hard case attitude alienated him from the boxing establishment. He also ran up against the stigma that fighters from here traditionally fare poorly at nationals. Crawford dispelled that image by advancing to the semis of the National Golden Gloves in Omaha. Outside the Gloves he beat virtually everyone in his weight and age class. But the politics of the sport pegged him a bad apple and so certain opportunities bypassed him.

McIntyre says, "He wasn't the poster boy for USA boxing. Terence was a bodacious kid. He's always been the underdog. When he went to the nationals and to the Olympic Trials people said you can't do it because you're from Neb. and they always get beat in the first round, so he's always had something against him."

Crawford never let those perceptions stop him, even after being kicked off the USA team, thus spoiling any chance of fighting in the Olympics, which was fine with the fighter, who had a bigger dream in mind.

Then, as now, nothing gets in the way of what Crawford wants.

"He was ranked number one and there was a national tournament in Calif. we couldn't afford to go to," says McIntyre. "USA Boxing gave him a stipend every other month and he saved his money and paid for his own ticket and hotel. At 17 he went out there by himself, he found a coach to get him to the weigh-ins. He found a way. That will and determination separates him from anybody I've ever run into."

Crawford's not only kept McIntyre and Minor in his camp. he's assembled a team made up of his old sparring partners and coaches. Loyalty is big with him. His other co-manager is Cameron Dunkin, a Las Vegas-based boxing magnet who handles the business side.

Some predict the highly skilled Crawford, who combines quick hands and feet with deft moves and some power, will handle the more experienced Burns. The champ's 36-2-1 record includes many high stakes fights but some recent disputed decisions. Others question how Crawford will deal with such a big stage before a hostile crowd.

Crawford says, "It's going to be a different atmosphere, everybody's going to be against me, but I like it like that because that's just going to feed me energy to shut 'em up and keep 'em quiet."

He's well aware he can't afford to leave anything to chance and give the judges any wiggle room to score the fight in favor of the home boy.

"That's the plan – to dominate like I'e been doing with all my other opponents. In my 22 fights I can't think of a fighter I've fought that won two rounds, so I've just got to be me and do what I do best."

He's keeping his emotions in check leading up to the bout.

"Honestly, I ain't got no feeling at all, like I'm not excited whatsoever. The other day BoMac said, 'Man, ain't you anxious?' and I was like, 'Naw, I'm just ready to fight' I've been doing this all my life, this is my dream. I never wanted to be an Olympian, I never wanted to win a gold medal, I always wanted to be a world champion. I wanted to turn pro at 17 but they insisted I try out for the Olympic team."

With him finally on the cusp of HIS dream he can't afford giddiness.

"This is what I wanted to do, so now that it's here I'm the one who's got to go in there and handle my business and then when I win it I'm going to be happy. It's strictly business right now. I'm not happy I'm fighting for a world title, no. I'm going to be happy when I win it though.

"I'm ready to do what I've been doing all my life and that's showing people how good my talent is."

Many Omaha boxing scene veterans believe Crawford may just be the best fighter, pound-for-pound, to ever come out of here.

Crawford, the father of two children, says his confidence is high because he's left nothing to chance in training. Sticking with a routine  that's worked before, he began training for Burns in Omaha, then went to Colorado Springs for the added conditioning high altitude promotes and the better sparring available there, the site of USA Boxing. Being away from home also helped eliminate distractions. McIntyre says it's all about getting focused and following a regimented workout process from 8 to 8 daily that ensures he didn't peak too early.

After the four-week camp Crawford returned home mid-February to fine-tune, stay sharp and maintain just the right edge.

Even after weeks of intense training that encompassed running, swimming, sit-ups and sparring, Crawford says there's still an element of doubt that naturally attends any fight.

"There's always going to be a doubt and a what-if with any fighter, I don't care who he is. They're going to always have doubt in the back of their mind. Did they do enough? What if this happens? What if that happens? But that's when you got to adapt and you got to adjust to the situation and that's what I plan to do."

As for his strategy, he says, "basically it's just me fighting my fight," adding "I just always feel like if I fight like I want to fight can't nobody beat me. I've got so many styles, so it's going to be hard to capitalize on one style because I'll switch up or change it up."

All the coaching and strategizing in the world doesn't mean anything, he says, if you can't execute it.

"It's up to me to establish it and carry it on into the ring. We can train all day, every day, we can do this and that. Like Ricky Burns, he can say he's got something new, he's going do this and that, but all that don't matter if you get in the ring and you can't establish what you want to do. When we get in the ring then it's all going to tell."

Crawford refuses to fight out of character. He's too smart to be drawn into adopting a style or forcing the action that's not in his best interest. Even when boos rained down on him in Orlando, Fla. as he dismantled Russian Andrey Klimov in an Oct. 4, 2013 fight, Crawford was content to stick with his plan of outboxing his foe even though going for a KO would have pleased onlookers and HBO executives. He says he'll neither get into a brawling match with Burns nor take undue chances testing the champ's repaired jaw, which was broken in his last title defense, for the sake of pleasing the crowd or boosting ratings.

"I'm not going to go out there and just go for haymakers and get caught with stupid stuff. I'm just going to go out there and do what I do and if the knockout comes it comes, if it don't it don't. I'm just going out there to win that title and that's the only thing on my mind."

He maintains a healthy respect for Burns or any opponent.

"I don't underestimate nobody. Even if it's a fight I know I'm going to knock the dude out I always go in there like, What if? It keeps me driving, it keeps me on my Ps and Qs, it keeps me more focused because you never know – one punch can beat you."

He says you also won't catch him doing any pre-fight grandstanding or gamesmanship at the weigh-in press conference. Not his style, though he's says if Burns comes at him he'll come right back. However, Crawford does use those occasions to size up his opponent and what he finds can be revealing.

"Sometimes I'll see right through you. I can see in your eyes a little twitch. On the outside you look like you're this big bad guy but on the inside you're afraid for your life. You're a nervous wreck."

At the end of the day, there's nothing about this fight or any fight that scares him. Compared to a bullet in the head it's no big deal.

"I've been shot, I'm not going over there worried about what's going to happen in the ring. I'm ready, period. I've got my mind made up, I've got my goals set, and I'm going up there and I'm going to get it. I'm not going to let nothing or nobody stop me from conquering my dreams."

Meanwhile, Team Crawford asks Omaha to do the right thing and stand up for one of your own as he goes for history.

Read more of Leo Adam Biga's work at leoadambiga.wordpress.com.

posted at 03:43 am
on Friday, February 21st, 2014

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