Next generation of North Omaha leaders eager for change

New crop of leaders emerging to keep momentum going

If redevelopment plans for northeast Omaha come to full fruition then that long depressed district will see progress at-scale after years of patchwork promises. Old and new leaders from largely African-American North Omaha will be the driving forces for change.

A few years and projects into the 30-year, $1.4 billion North Omaha Revitalization Village Plan, everyone agrees this massive revival is necessary for the area to be on the right side of the tipping point. The plan's part of a mosaic of efforts addressing educational, economic, health care, housing, employment disparities. Behind these initiatives is a coalition from the private and public sectors working together to apply a focused, holistic approach for making a lasting difference. 

Key contributors are African-American leaders who emerged in the last decade to assume top posts in organizations and bodies leading the charge. African-American Empowerment Network President-Facilitator Willie Barney, Douglas Country Treasurer John Ewing Jr., Urban League of Nebraska Executive Director Thomas Warren and Omaha City Councilman Ben Gray are among the most visible. When they entered the scene they represented a new leadership class but individually and collectively they've become its well-established players. 

More recently, Nebraska State Sen. Tanya Cook and Omaha 360 Director Jamie Anders-Kemp joined their ranks. Others, such as North Omaha Development Corporation Executive Director Michael Maroney and former Omaha City Councilwoman and Neb. State Sen. Brenda Council, have been doing this work for decades. 

With so much yet to come and on the line, what happens when the current crop of leaders drops away? Who will be the new faces and voices of transformation? Are there clear pathways to leadership? Are there mechanisms to groom new leaders? Is there generational tension between older and younger leaders? What does the next generation want to see happen and where do they see things headed?

The Reader asked veteran and emerging players for answers and they said talent is already in place or poised to assume next generation leadership. They express optimism about North O's direction and a consensus for how to get there. They say leadership also comes in many forms. It's Sharif Liwaru as executive director of the Malcolm X Memorial Foundation, which he hopes to turn into an international attraction. It's his artist-educator wife Gabrielle Gaines Liwaru. Together, they're a dynamic couple focused on community betterment. Union for Contemporary Arts founder-director Brigitte McQueen, Loves Jazz and Arts Center Executive Director Tim Clark and Great Plains Black History Museum Board Chairman Jim Beatty are embedded in the community leading endeavors that are part of North O's revival.

Seventy-Five North Revitalization Corp. Executive Director Othello Meadows is a more behind-the-scenes leader. His nonprofit has acquired property and finished first-round financing for the Highlander mixed-used project, a key Village Plan component. The project will redevelop 40 acres into mixed income housing, green spaces and on-site support services for "a purpose-built" urban community.

Meadows says the opportunity to "work on a project of this magnitude in a city I care about is a chance of a lifetime." He's encouraged by the "burgeoning support for doing significant things in the community." In his view, the best thing leaders can do is "execute and make projects a reality," adding, "When things start to happen in a real concrete fashion then you start to peel back some of that hopelessness and woundedness. I think people are really tired of rhetoric, studies and statistics and want to see something come to life." He says new housing in the Prospect Hill neighborhood is tangible positive activity.

Meadows doesn't consider himself a traditional leader.

"I think leadership is first and foremost about service and humility. I try to think of myself as somebody who is a vessel for the hopes and desires of this neighborhood. True leadership is service and service for a cause, so if that's the definition of leadership, then sure, I am one."

He feels North O's suffered from expecting leadership to come from charismatic saviors who lead great causes from on high.

"In my mind we have to have a different paradigm for the way we consider leadership. I think it happens on a much smaller scale. I think of people who are leaders on their block, people who serve their community by being good neighbors or citizens. That's the kind of leadership that's overlooked. I think it has to shift from we've got five or six people we look to for leadership to we've got 500 or 600 people who are all active leaders in their own community. It needs to shift to that more grassroots, bottom-up view."

Where can aspiring North O leaders get their start?

"Wherever you are, lead," John Ewing says. "Whatever opportunities come, seize them. Schools, places of worship, neighborhood and elected office all offer opportunities if we see the specific opportunity." 

"They need to get in where they fit in and grow from there," says Dell Gines, senior community development advisor, Omaha Branch at Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City.

Empowerment Network board member and Douglas County Health Department health educator Aja Anderson says many people lead without recognition but that doesn't make them any less leaders.

"There are individuals on our streets, in our classrooms, everywhere, every day guiding those around them to some greater destiny or outcome," Anderson says.

Meadows feels the community has looked too often for leadership to come from outside.

"A community needs to guide its own destiny rather than say, 'Who's going to come in from outside and fix this?'"

He applauds the Empowerment Network for "trying to find ways to help people become their own change agents."

Carver Bank Interim Program Coordinator JoAnna LeFlore is someone often identified as an emerging leader. She in turn looks to some of her Next Gen colleagues for inspiration. 

"I’m very inspired by Brigitte McQueen, Othello Meadows and Sharif Liwaru. They all have managed to chase their dreams, advocate for the well-being of North Omaha and maintain a professional career despite all of the obstacles in their way. You have to have a certain level of hunger in North Omaha in order to survive. What follows that drive is a certain level of humility once you become successful. This is why I look up to them."

LeFlore is emboldened to continue serving her community by the progress she sees happening.

"I see more creative entrepreneurs and businesses. I see more community-wide events celebrating our heritage. I see more financial support for redevelopment. I feel my part in this is to continue to encourage others who share interest in the growth of North Omaha. I’ve built trusting relationships with people along the way. I am intentional about my commitments because those relationships and the missions are important to me. Simply being a genuine supporter, who also gets her hands dirty, is my biggest contribution. 

"Moving forward, I will make an honest effort to offer my expertise to help build communication strategies, offer consultations for grassroots marketing and event planning and be an advocate for positive change. I am also not afraid to speak up about important issues."

If LeFlore's a Next Gen leader, then Omaha Small Business Network Executive Director Julia Parker is, too. Parker says, "There is certainly a changing of the guard taking place throughout Omaha and North O is not an exception. Over the next several years, I hope even more young professionals will continue to take high level positions in the community. I see several young leaders picking up the mic." She's among the new guard between her OSBN work and the Urban Collaborative: A Commitment to Community group she co-founded that she says "focuses on fostering meaningful conversation around how we can improve our neighborhoods and the entire city."

Parker left her hometown for a time and she says, "Leaving Omaha changed my perspective and really prompted me to come home with a more critical eye and a yearning for change."

Like Parker, Othello Meadows left here but moved back when he discerned he could make a "meaningful" impact on a community he found beset by despair. That bleak environment is what's led many young, gifted and black to leave here. Old-line North O leader Thomas Warren says, "I am concerned about the brain drain we experience in Omaha, particularly of our best and brightest young African-Americans students who leave. We need to create an environment that is welcoming to the next generation where they can thrive and strive to reach their full potential." Two more entrenched leaders, John Ewing and Douglas County Commissioner Chris Rodgers, are also worried about losing North O's promising talents. "We have to identify, retain and develop our talent pool in Omaha," Ewing says. 

Omaha Schools Board member Yolanda Williams says leadership doors have not always been open to young transplants like herself – she's originally from Seattle – who lack built-in influence bases. 

"I had to go knock on the door and I knocked and knocked, and then I started banging on the door until my mentor John Ewing and I sat down for lunch and I asked, 'How do younger leaders get in these positions if you all are holding these positions for years? How do I get into a leadership role if nobody is willing to get out of the way?' They need to step out of the way so we can move up.

"It's nothing against our elder leadership because I think they do a great job but they need to reach out and find someone to mentor and groom because if not what happens when they leave those positions?"

Ewing acknowledges "There has been and will always be tension between the generations," but he adds, "I believe this creative tension is a great thing. It keeps the so-called established leaders from becoming complacent and keeps the emerging leaders hungry for more success as a community. I believe most of the relationships are cordial and productive as well as collaborative. I believe everyone can always do more to listen. I believe the young professional networks are a great avenue. I also believe organizations like the Empowerment Network should reach out to emerging leaders to be inclusive."

Author, motivational speaker and The Truth Heals founder-CEO Tunette Powell says, "It's really amazing when you get those older leaders on board because they can champion you. They've allowed me to speak at so many different places." Powell senses a change afoot among veteran leaders, "They have held down these neighborhoods for so long and I think they're slowly handing over and allowing young people to have a platform. i see that bridge." As a young leader, she says, "it's not like I want to step on their toes. We need this team. It's not just going to be one leader, it's not going to be young versus old, it's going to be old and young coming together." 

In her own case, Yolanda Williams says she simply wouldn't be denied, "I got tired of waiting. I was diligent, I was purpose-driven. It was very much networking and being places and getting my name out there. I mean, I was here to stay, you were not just going to get rid of me."

LeFlore agrees more can be done to let new blood in.

"I think some established leaders are ignoring the young professionals who have potential to do more."

Despite progress, Powell says "there are not enough young people at the table." She believes inviting their participation is incumbent on stakeholder organizations. She would also like to see Omaha 360 or another entity develop a formal mentoring program or process for older leaders "to show us that staircase."

Some older leaders do push younger colleagues to enter the fray.

Shawntal Smith, statewide administrator for Community Services for Lutheran Family Services of Nebraska, says Brenda Council, Willie Barney and Ben Gray are some who've nudged her.

"I get lots of encouragement from many inside and outside of North Omaha to serve and it is a good feeling to know people trust you to represent them. It is also a great responsibility."

Everyone has somebody who prods them along. For Tunette Powell, it's Center for Holistic Development President-CEO Doris Moore. For Williams, it's treasurer John Ewing. But at the end of the day anyone who wants to lead has to make it happen. Williams, who won her school board seat in a district-wide election, says she overcame certain disadvantages and a minuscule campaign budget through "conviction and passion," adding, "The reality is if you want to do something you've got to put yourself out there." She built a coalition of parent and educator constituents working as an artist-in-residence and Partnership 4 Kids resource in schools. Before that, Williams says she made herself known by volunteering. "That started my journey."

Powell broke through volunteering as well. "I wasn't from here, nobody knew me, so I volunteered and it's transformed my life," says the San Antonio native.

"The best experience, in my opinion, is board service," OSBN's Julia Parker says. "Young leaders have a unique opportunity to pull back the curtain and see how an organization actually functions or doesn't. It's a high level way to cut your teeth in the social sector."

Chris Rodgers, director of community and government relations at Creighton University, agrees: "I think small non-profits looking for active, conscientious board members are a good start. Also volunteering for causes you feel deeply about and taking on some things that stretch you are always good." 

The Urban League's Thomas Warren says, "We have to encourage the next generation of leaders to invest in their own professional growth and take advantage of leadership development opportunities. They should attend workshops and seminars to enhance their skills or go back to school and pursue advanced degrees. Acquiring credentials ensures you are prepared when opportunities present themselves."

Gaining experience is vital but a fire-in-the-belly is a must, too. Yolanda Williams says she was driven to serve on the school board because "I felt like I could bring a voice, especially for North Omaha, that hadn't yet been heard at the table as a younger single parent representing the concerns and struggles of a lot of other parents. And I'm a little bit outspoken I say what I need to say unapoligitically."   

Powell says young leaders like her and Williams have the advantage of "not being far removed from the hard times the people we're trying to reach are experiencing." She says she and her peers are the children of the war on drugs and its cycle of broken homes. "That's a piece of what we are, so we get it. We can reach these young people because our generation reflects theirs. I see myself in so many young people."

Just a few years ago Powell had quit college, was on food stamps and didn't know what to do with her life. "People pulled me up, they elevated me, and I have to give that back," she says. In her work with fatherless girls she says "what I find is you've got to meet them where they're at. As younger leaders we're not afraid to do that, we're not afraid to take some risks and do some things differently. We're seeing we need something fresh. Creativity is huge. When you look at young and old leaders, we all have that same passion, we all want the same thing, but how we go about it is completely different."

Powell says the African-American Young Professionals group begun by fellow rising young star Symone Sanders is a powerful connecting point where "dynamic people doing great things" find a common ground of interests and a forum to network. "We respect each other because we know we're all going in that direction of change."

Sanders, who's worked with the Empowerment Network and is now communications assistant for Democratic gubernatorial candidate Chuck Hassebrook, says AAYP is designed to give like-minded young professionals an avenue "to come together and get to know one another and to be introduced in those rooms and at those tables" where policy and program decisions get made.

Aja Anderson believes Next Gen leaders "bridge the gap," saying, "I think this generation of leaders is going to be influential and do exceptionally well at creating unity and collaboration among community leaders and members across generations. We’re fueled with new ideas, creativity and innovation. Having this group of individuals at the table will certainly make some nervous, others excited and re-ignite passion and ideas in our established group."

County treasure John Ewing sees the benefit of new approaches. "I believe our emerging leaders have an entrepreneurial spirit that will be helpful in building an African-American business class in Omaha." 

While Williams sees things "opening up," she says, "I think a lot of potential leaders have left here because that opportunity isn't as open as it should be." 

Enough are staying to make a difference. 

"It's exciting to see people I've known a long time staying committed to where we grew up," 75 North's Othello Meadows says. "It's good to see other people who at least for awhile are going to play their role and do their part."

Shawntal Smith of Lutheran Family Services is bullish on the Next Gen.

"We are starting to come into our own. We are being appointed to boards and accepting high level positions of influence in our companies, firms, agencies and churches. We are highly educated and we are fighting the brain drain that usually takes place when young, gifted minorities leave this city for more diverse cities with better opportunities. We are remaining loyal to Omaha and we are trying to make it better through our visible efforts in the community.  

"People are starting to recognize we are dedicated and our opinions, ideas and leadership matter."

Old and young leaders feel more blacks are needed in policymaking capacities. Rodgers and Anderson are eager to see more representation in legislative chambers and corporate board rooms. 

Warren says, "I do feel there needs to be more opportunities in the private sector for emerging leaders who are indigenous to this community." He feels corporations should do more to identify and develop homegrown talent who are then more likely to stay.

Shawntal Smith describes an added benefit of locally grown leaders.

"North Omahans respect a young professional who grew up in North Omaha and continues to reside in North Omaha and contribute to making it better. Both my husband and I live, shop, work, volunteer and attend church in North Omaha. We believe strongly in the resiliency of our community and we love being a positive addition to North Omaha and leaders for our sons and others to model."

With leadership comes scrutiny and criticism.

"You have to be willing to take a risk and nobody succeeds without failure along the way to grow from," Rodgers says. "If you fail, fail quick and recover. Learn from the mistake and don't make the same mistakes. You have to be comfortable with the fact that not everybody will like you."

Tunette Powell isn't afraid to stumble because like her Next Gen peers she's too busy getting things done.

"As Maya Angelou said, 'Nothing will work unless you do,' I want people to say about me, 'She gave everything she had.'"

Read more of Leo Adam Biga's work at leoadambiga.wordpress.com.

posted at 05:42 pm
on Sunday, July 20th, 2014

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