Art imitates life as themes in play cut closely for its stars

Metoyers use play to recall their family’s civil rights activism

Art imitates life when siblings Camille Metoyer Moten and Lanette Metoyer Moore evoke the Delany sisters in the African-American oral-history show Having Our Say at the Omaha Community Playhouse.

Just as the play's real-life Sadie and Bessie Delany followed their family's barrier-breaking path the Metoyers hail from high achievers and activists. The black branch of the Delanys' mixed race Southern lineage produced land owners and professionals. Their father was the first black bishop of the Episcopal Church in America. Sadie became a teacher. Bessie, a dentist. Similarly, the Metoyers trace the mixed heritage on their father's side to the Melrose Plantation in La. where ancestors formed a black aristocracy, Their mother and her family made the black migration from Miss. to the North for a better life.

The Metoyers, both veteran Omaha theater performers, say they've never before played roles whose familial-cultural threads adhere so closely to their own lives. Like their counterparts, the Metoyers put much stock in faith and education. The play's also giving the sisters and their brother Raymond Metoyer, an Atlanta, Ga. broadcast journalist whose news career started in Omaha, a platform to discuss the vital work done by their late parents, Ray and Lois Metoyer, in the struggle to secure equal rights here. The couple were involved in the Nebraska Urban League, which the senior Metoyer once headed, the local chapter of the NAACP and the Citizens Coordinating Committee for Civil Liberties (4CL). They participated in marches. They had their family integrate a neighborhood. They sent their kids to white schools.

Their father was active in the 4CL's predecessor, the De Porres Club.

"We knew our parents were trailblazers but we held a lot inside and this ([play) gives us a voice to be able to elevate them," Lanette says.

"I'm really happy about this opportunity to bring to light all the things our parents did and worked so hard for," Camille says.

"I'm very proud of my parents," Raymond says. "They were very much strong foot soldiers in the civil rights movement in Omaha. They were part of a collective effort to improve housing, education and employment for minorities. They were more interested in the results than in individual glory, which seems to be something lost today. Working together to make things better was very much part of what they believed in and pushed for as a part of that collective.

"They instilled in us that same striving for being better."

The siblings say their parents shared the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.'s dream that blacks "will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin, but by the content of their character."

Lanette says her kid brother, L.A. musician Louis Metoyer "became exactly what our parents wanted for all of us because he got to reap all the benefits of us moving into an all-white neighborhood. He was able to play with white kids and make lasting friendships."

Camille says, "Out of all of us I think he is the one who sees no color."

Raymond says his folks believed in "leading by example" and thus his aspirational father, a Boys Town senior counselor and owner of the family's barbecue joint on North 24th Street, took great pains with his appearance and speech.

"It wasn't just about getting there. it was about how you handled yourself when you got there that made a difference," he says.. "Our father always carried himself with dignity and strength. He projected the image he wanted people to see African-Americans could portray. He was just trying to show he belonged, that he was a significant member of the community because he had a right to be. My mother had that same persona. Both our parents instilled that in us. too."

Raymond's continued this leadership legacy in the National Association for Black Journalists and in his civil rights documentaries (Who Killed Emmett Till?). He admires his sisters for continuing the legacy as well.

"I'm so proud of my sisters being in this play because they're carrying themselves with the same dignity they were brought up with."

Like her character Sadie Lanette's advanced far in the educational field and like her character Bessie Camille's spoken out against racism.

As kids the siblings got caught up in some of their folks' activism. Camille was 9 when taken out of school to accompany her parents in a 1963 4CL demonstration for open housing at City Hall. The marchers proved well-schooled in nonviolent civil disobedience.

"We were walking around in a circle in the chambers carrying placards," recalls Camille. "We were asked to disperse and of course we refused, and then they called the police in and we all sat down on the floor. I was with my dad in his lap when the police literally picked the two of us up and carried us out with me still on his lap."

Before Metoyer, with Camille in tow, got transported to police headquarters officers let him down. As he carried Camille in his arms a news photographer snapped a picture of this dignified, loving black father comforting his adorable little girl, who sported braids and with tortoise shell frame eyeglasses. The photo made the wires.

The events made an impression on Camille.

"I remember being excited because there was so much energy. I knew what we were doing was something very important and I knew it was about fighting for our rights as black people. I remember being just a little bit scared by the police but my dad was there so I felt very safe with him."

Social justice was discussed in the Metoyer home.

"We were the family that all sat down to dinner together," says Camille, "and all the conversation was about what was going on."

The Metoyer children often tagged along with their progressive parents to meetings and gatherings. It meant getting to hear and meet Malcolm X and Jesse Jackson, in 1964 and 1969, respectively. Between those events the Metoyers integrated the Maple Village neighborhood in northwest Omaha in 1966.

"We knew it was something kind of groundbreaking but we were prepared because all of our lives we'd been taught to be on the frontlines," says Lanette.

Raymond recalls the angry stares the family got just while driving through all-white areas. A petition circulated to try and prevent them from moving in. On move-in day some neighbors gathered outside to glare. At night his armed father and grandfather stood guard inside. It reminded his mother of what she thought she'd left behind in Miss. The house only got egged and shamed neighbors hosed off the mess.

Camille and Lanette remember threatening phone calls, nails scattered in the driveway, strange cars pulling up at night to train headlights in the windows, tense looks, awkward exchanges. At their various schools the kids encountered racism. They followed the example and admonition of their parents, whom Camille says "always addressed discrimination from an educational standpoint," adding, "They were like, 'Don't get mad, just be enlightened.'"

Little by little the Metoyers found acceptance if not always fairness.

The OCP production of the Tony-nominated Having Our Say by Emily Mann, a past Great Plains Theatre Conference guest playwright, is a catharsis for the sisters.

"Doing this play has helped us in our relationship as sisters," says Lanette. "We love to laugh just like the Delanys do. We're storytellers like them. That tie between us now is stronger, especially after going through what Camille went through this past year (breast cancer)."

On another personal note, the play honors figures like their parents who had the courage of their convictions to stand up and be counted.

"It's like finally they're having their say," says Camille.

The play runs through Feb. 9. For show times-tickets, visit www.omahacommunityplayhouse.com.

Read more of Leo Adam Biga's work at leoadambiga.wordpress.com.

posted at 04:42 pm
on Monday, January 27th, 2014

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